Discussion:
Do you ever forget how to ride a motorcycle?
(too old to reply)
Suzuki Ninja
2005-02-25 06:02:38 UTC
Permalink
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?

In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.

Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
~kurt
2005-02-25 06:14:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I know I forgot how to ride a bicycle after a decade of not riding one.
It was *very* weird. Learning how to turn and whatnot. The skills came
back very quickly though.

- Kurt
Timberwoof
2005-02-25 06:18:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Let me ask a similar question: Would you fly in an airliner whose pilot had just
returned from a ten-year vacation, or would you prefer that he first take a
refresher course and get a couple of hundred hours of flying time?
--
Timberwoof <me at timberwoof dot com>
faq: http://www.timberwoof.com/motorcycle/faq.shtml
sorry: http://www.sorryeverybody.com/gallery/200/
Rob Kleinschmidt
2005-02-26 01:58:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Timberwoof
Let me ask a similar question: Would you fly in an airliner whose pilot had just
returned from a ten-year vacation, or would you prefer that he first take a
refresher course and get a couple of hundred hours of flying time?
It all depends. If he's in the reserves, called up and about to be
sent to Iraq, I understand that makes him instantly competent again.
Timberwoof
2005-02-26 02:17:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Timberwoof
Post by Timberwoof
Let me ask a similar question: Would you fly in an airliner whose
pilot had just
Post by Timberwoof
returned from a ten-year vacation, or would you prefer that he first
take a
Post by Timberwoof
refresher course and get a couple of hundred hours of flying time?
It all depends. If he's in the reserves, called up and about to be
sent to Iraq, I understand that makes him instantly competent again.
Oh, yes, and Humvees armored with scrap steel found at a junkyard are perfectly
safe for cruising in the lower east side of Baghdad in, too.
--
Timberwoof <me at timberwoof dot com>
faq: http://www.timberwoof.com/motorcycle/faq.shtml
sorry: http://www.sorryeverybody.com/gallery/200/
Phil Scott
2005-02-28 22:05:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Timberwoof
Post by Timberwoof
Let me ask a similar question: Would you fly in an
airliner whose
Post by Timberwoof
pilot had just
Post by Timberwoof
returned from a ten-year vacation, or would you prefer
that he first
Post by Timberwoof
take a
Post by Timberwoof
refresher course and get a couple of hundred hours of
flying time?
Post by Timberwoof
It all depends. If he's in the reserves, called up and about
to be
Post by Timberwoof
sent to Iraq, I understand that makes him instantly
competent again.

Yes..instantly. and if you are a ground troup you get so
competent that you dont even need body armor or armored
vehicles...

Phil Scott
Jason
2005-02-25 06:33:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
Well, my dad had not rode a bike in 20+ years. I bought my vn800 and he
wanted to ride it around the block. Took him a couple of trips to get
used to it again but after about 15 minutes he was scraping the pegs
going around corners and having a great time. Then I made him get off
and now he want's a Nomad. So yeah he was very rusty but the rust
worked it's way loose pretty quick.
Tim
2005-02-25 12:47:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jason
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
Well, my dad had not rode a bike in 20+ years. I bought my vn800 and he
wanted to ride it around the block. Took him a couple of trips to get
used to it again but after about 15 minutes he was scraping the pegs
going around corners and having a great time. Then I made him get off
and now he want's a Nomad. So yeah he was very rusty but the rust
worked it's way loose pretty quick.
And did you and your dad practice maximum braking and swerving? Did you discuss
looking all the way through a corner prior to entering it? Did you evaluate one
another's head turns? Did you discuss what you would do as you approached grade
level intersections? Did you talk about ways to maximuze your visibility to
other road users? Did one or the other of you talk about the inevitable loss of
nght vision acuity in the human male over a period of 20+ years?

If not, those would all be good things to consider, as I'm sure any son who
loves his dad enough to lend his dad his motorcycle wants him to be around for
as long as possible!
Jason
2005-02-25 15:56:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Post by Jason
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
Well, my dad had not rode a bike in 20+ years. I bought my vn800 and he
wanted to ride it around the block. Took him a couple of trips to get
used to it again but after about 15 minutes he was scraping the pegs
going around corners and having a great time. Then I made him get off
and now he want's a Nomad. So yeah he was very rusty but the rust
worked it's way loose pretty quick.
And did you and your dad practice maximum braking and swerving? Did you discuss
looking all the way through a corner prior to entering it? Did you evaluate one
another's head turns? Did you discuss what you would do as you approached grade
level intersections? Did you talk about ways to maximuze your
visibility to
Post by Tim
other road users? Did one or the other of you talk about the
inevitable loss of
Post by Tim
nght vision acuity in the human male over a period of 20+ years?
If not, those would all be good things to consider, as I'm sure any son who
loves his dad enough to lend his dad his motorcycle wants him to be around for
as long as possible!
He rode the bike around the block a few times in a residential area.
Was on it for maybe 20 minutes tops. Anyways most of that I had
discussed with him and amazingly he would tell me how he remembered
doing this or that and gave me lots of tips from back when he rode. He
still knew everything I could think of, the only thing that he did not
remember was using the front and rear brake at the same time. For some
reason he never had used it before. I told him to try using both and
see how much easier it was stopping the bike. Oh yeah, he also had
never learned to countersteer which I taught him pretty quickly, his
reply after doing it the first time was "Cool!."
Cam Penner
2005-02-25 17:26:15 UTC
Permalink
In article <1109346972.829673.164010
@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, ***@hotmail.com
says...
Post by Jason
Was on it for maybe 20 minutes tops. Anyways most of that I had
discussed with him and amazingly he would tell me how he remembered
doing this or that and gave me lots of tips from back when he rode. He
still knew everything I could think of, the only thing that he did not
remember was using the front and rear brake at the same time. For some
reason he never had used it before. I told him to try using both and
see how much easier it was stopping the bike. Oh yeah, he also had
never learned to countersteer which I taught him pretty quickly, his
reply after doing it the first time was "Cool!."
Let me get this straight. You're calling a guy who never
used both brakes, and who never learned to countersteer an
"experienced rider"?

I think that pretty much nails the case for the MSF closed.
This "experienced" rider was missing 2 of the MOST BASIC
FUNDAMENTAL skills of street riding. $198 would the best
money ever spent on this guy's riding.
--
Cam
'89 RZ 350
Jamin Kortegard
2005-02-25 18:09:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cam Penner
In article <1109346972.829673.164010
@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, ***@hotmail.com
says...
Post by Jason
Was on it for maybe 20 minutes tops. Anyways most of that I had
discussed with him and amazingly he would tell me how he remembered
doing this or that and gave me lots of tips from back when he rode. He
still knew everything I could think of, the only thing that he did not
remember was using the front and rear brake at the same time. For some
reason he never had used it before. I told him to try using both and
see how much easier it was stopping the bike. Oh yeah, he also had
never learned to countersteer which I taught him pretty quickly, his
reply after doing it the first time was "Cool!."
So he knew everything you knew, aside from the using both brakes and all
about counter steering? Well, logically speaking, that doesn't really
indicate how much either of you know about actually riding a motorcycle. If
I hopped in a dump truck with my best friend, I bet we'd know approximately
the same amount regarding how to operate the thing. We'd probably be able to
roll down the road and stop about when we wanted to, but that's a far cry
from being proficient.

Rather than using each other as yardsticks for motorcycle knowledge, maybe
you should make the comparison against known experts. If you're a qualified
MSF instructor, my apologies for assuming otherwise.
Post by Cam Penner
Let me get this straight. You're calling a guy who never
used both brakes, and who never learned to countersteer an
"experienced rider"?
I think that pretty much nails the case for the MSF closed.
This "experienced" rider was missing 2 of the MOST BASIC
FUNDAMENTAL skills of street riding. $198 would the best
money ever spent on this guy's riding.
What Cam said.
--
Jamin Kortegard
2002 YZF-R1 / 2003 WRX

"Hokey 600s and trackday usability are no match
for a good literbike at your side, kid."
- Michael
Jason
2005-02-25 20:45:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jamin Kortegard
Post by Cam Penner
In article <1109346972.829673.164010
@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, ***@hotmail.com
says...
Post by Jason
Was on it for maybe 20 minutes tops. Anyways most of that I had
discussed with him and amazingly he would tell me how he
remembered
Post by Jamin Kortegard
Post by Cam Penner
Post by Jason
doing this or that and gave me lots of tips from back when he rode. He
still knew everything I could think of, the only thing that he did not
remember was using the front and rear brake at the same time. For some
reason he never had used it before. I told him to try using both and
see how much easier it was stopping the bike. Oh yeah, he also had
never learned to countersteer which I taught him pretty quickly, his
reply after doing it the first time was "Cool!."
So he knew everything you knew, aside from the using both brakes and all
about counter steering? Well, logically speaking, that doesn't really
indicate how much either of you know about actually riding a
motorcycle. If
Post by Jamin Kortegard
I hopped in a dump truck with my best friend, I bet we'd know
approximately
Post by Jamin Kortegard
the same amount regarding how to operate the thing. We'd probably be able to
roll down the road and stop about when we wanted to, but that's a far cry
from being proficient.
Rather than using each other as yardsticks for motorcycle knowledge, maybe
you should make the comparison against known experts. If you're a qualified
MSF instructor, my apologies for assuming otherwise.
Post by Cam Penner
Let me get this straight. You're calling a guy who never
used both brakes, and who never learned to countersteer an
"experienced rider"?
I think that pretty much nails the case for the MSF closed.
This "experienced" rider was missing 2 of the MOST BASIC
FUNDAMENTAL skills of street riding. $198 would the best
money ever spent on this guy's riding.
What Cam said.
--
Jamin Kortegard
2002 YZF-R1 / 2003 WRX
"Hokey 600s and trackday usability are no match
for a good literbike at your side, kid."
- Michael
Yeah, except MSF is booked up for the next year or so. Seems one 12
person course a month doesn't service a whole state very well. Imagine
that. He needs to learn several skills before he starts riding
regularly. Mostly he needs to just practice turning and stopping. The
basic stuff. I doubt he'll ever get a bike though because my mother
hates them and is still pissed off with me for buying one almost a year
later.
"Wakko" @#$^spam!comcast.net>
2005-02-25 21:33:00 UTC
Permalink
In news:***@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com,
Jason <***@hotmail.com> typed:
<snip>
Post by Jason
Yeah, except MSF is booked up for the next year or so. Seems one 12
person course a month doesn't service a whole state very well. Imagine
that.
<snip>

You hear this time and time again. What's the cause? Sounds like an
opportunity for someone to make some money.
--
"Wakko" Waco Glenn NTXNS TOMKAT SENS
'03 FLSTSI - "BlingBling" (The rare pigs reign)
CRABB'04 MAMBM'04 VERMORT14 PHS'04
"Even a bad day on the bike is better than the best day in a car."
Jamin Kortegard
2005-02-26 00:30:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jason
Yeah, except MSF is booked up for the next year or so. Seems one 12
person course a month doesn't service a whole state very well. Imagine
that. He needs to learn several skills before he starts riding
regularly. Mostly he needs to just practice turning and stopping. The
basic stuff. I doubt he'll ever get a bike though because my mother
hates them and is still pissed off with me for buying one almost a year
later.
Well, in lieu of professional instruction, I'd suggest taking a look at some
of the very good books on the topic of riding well and riding safely. A few
suggestions:

"Proficient Motorcycling", by David L. Hough
"More Proficient Motorcycling", by David L. Hough
"Sport Riding Techniques", by Nick Ienatsch

I've read these and several other similar books, and these ones were my
favorites.
--
Jamin Kortegard
2002 YZF-R1 / 2003 WRX

"Hokey 600s and trackday usability are no match
for a good literbike at your side, kid."
- Michael
Lyle Gunderson
2005-03-12 15:58:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jamin Kortegard
Post by Cam Penner
In article <1109346972.829673.164010
@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>, ***@hotmail.com
says...
Post by Jason
Was on it for maybe 20 minutes tops. Anyways most of that I had
discussed with him and amazingly he would tell me how he remembered
doing this or that and gave me lots of tips from back when he rode. He
still knew everything I could think of, the only thing that he did not
remember was using the front and rear brake at the same time. For some
reason he never had used it before. I told him to try using both and
see how much easier it was stopping the bike. Oh yeah, he also had
never learned to countersteer which I taught him pretty quickly, his
reply after doing it the first time was "Cool!."
So he knew everything you knew, aside from the using both brakes and all
about counter steering? Well, logically speaking, that doesn't really
indicate how much either of you know about actually riding a motorcycle. If
I hopped in a dump truck with my best friend, I bet we'd know approximately
the same amount regarding how to operate the thing. We'd probably be able to
roll down the road and stop about when we wanted to, but that's a far cry
from being proficient.
Rather than using each other as yardsticks for motorcycle knowledge, maybe
you should make the comparison against known experts. If you're a qualified
MSF instructor, my apologies for assuming otherwise.
Post by Cam Penner
Let me get this straight. You're calling a guy who never
used both brakes, and who never learned to countersteer an
"experienced rider"?
I think that pretty much nails the case for the MSF closed.
This "experienced" rider was missing 2 of the MOST BASIC
FUNDAMENTAL skills of street riding. $198 would the best
money ever spent on this guy's riding.
What Cam said.
The point is, though, that he hadn't *forgotten* how to ride. He never
had those skills you know are essential, so he didn't forget them. The
skills he did have come back to him fairly quickly.
--
Lyle D. Gunderson * You can lead a gift horse to water,
lyle *at* mac.com * but an early bird in the hand
DoD # 8383 * is worth a pound of cure.
Beav
2005-02-28 11:46:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jason
Post by Tim
Post by Jason
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a
few
Post by Tim
Post by Jason
Post by Suzuki Ninja
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
Well, my dad had not rode a bike in 20+ years. I bought my vn800
and he
Post by Tim
Post by Jason
wanted to ride it around the block. Took him a couple of trips to
get
Post by Tim
Post by Jason
used to it again but after about 15 minutes he was scraping the
pegs
Post by Tim
Post by Jason
going around corners and having a great time. Then I made him get
off
Post by Tim
Post by Jason
and now he want's a Nomad. So yeah he was very rusty but the rust
worked it's way loose pretty quick.
And did you and your dad practice maximum braking and swerving? Did
you discuss
Post by Tim
looking all the way through a corner prior to entering it? Did you
evaluate one
Post by Tim
another's head turns? Did you discuss what you would do as you
approached grade
Post by Tim
level intersections? Did you talk about ways to maximuze your
visibility to
Post by Tim
other road users? Did one or the other of you talk about the
inevitable loss of
Post by Tim
nght vision acuity in the human male over a period of 20+ years?
If not, those would all be good things to consider, as I'm sure any
son who
Post by Tim
loves his dad enough to lend his dad his motorcycle wants him to be
around for
Post by Tim
as long as possible!
He rode the bike around the block a few times in a residential area.
Was on it for maybe 20 minutes tops. Anyways most of that I had
discussed with him and amazingly he would tell me how he remembered
doing this or that and gave me lots of tips from back when he rode. He
still knew everything I could think of, the only thing that he did not
remember was using the front and rear brake at the same time. For some
reason he never had used it before.
Not to pour oil on water here, but if Dad didn't use both brakes when he was
riding "back then", how did he stop his bikes quickly and safely in an
emergency?

I told him to try using both and
Post by Jason
see how much easier it was stopping the bike. Oh yeah, he also had
never learned to countersteer which I taught him pretty quickly, his
reply after doing it the first time was "Cool!."
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?

Beav
Saddlebag
2005-02-28 23:53:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beav
Post by Jason
see how much easier it was stopping the bike. Oh yeah, he also had
never learned to countersteer which I taught him pretty quickly, his
reply after doing it the first time was "Cool!."
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
The same way 98% of motorcyclists still do, very slowly.
Tim
2005-03-01 00:28:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it, as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had not heard of countersteering
before.
Calgary
2005-03-01 01:12:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it, as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had not heard of countersteering
before.
I think most of us picked it up as kids riding a bicycle. I can't
remember the first time I heard the term counter steering but it was
well after I started riding.


----------------------------------------

Don Binns
2000 - Yamaha Venture Millennium Edition
84 - Virago 1000

You start with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck

http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/reeky.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/banff.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/kananaskis.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/walkercalgary.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/calgarybrowning.htm
Biff Bentley
2005-03-01 01:56:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Calgary
Post by Tim
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it, as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had not heard of
countersteering
before.
I think most of us picked it up as kids riding a bicycle. I can't
remember the first time I heard the term counter steering but it was
well after I started riding.
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle speeds. The number I was told
was under 20 mph. I'm sure of it, i read it on the internet!
Calgary
2005-03-01 02:30:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Biff Bentley
Post by Calgary
I think most of us picked it up as kids riding a bicycle. I can't
remember the first time I heard the term counter steering but it was
well after I started riding.
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle speeds. The number I was told
was under 20 mph. I'm sure of it, i read it on the internet!
Then it must be true!

I don't doubt the under 20mph +/- can't countersteer statement, but I
rode my bicycles well over 20mph, even as a kid.


----------------------------------------

Don Binns
2000 - Yamaha Venture Millennium Edition
84 - Virago 1000

You start with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck

http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/reeky.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/banff.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/kananaskis.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/walkercalgary.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/calgarybrowning.htm
Bownse
2005-03-01 03:07:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Calgary
Post by Biff Bentley
Post by Calgary
I think most of us picked it up as kids riding a bicycle. I can't
remember the first time I heard the term counter steering but it was
well after I started riding.
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle speeds. The number I was told
was under 20 mph. I'm sure of it, i read it on the internet!
Then it must be true!
I don't doubt the under 20mph +/- can't countersteer statement, but I
rode my bicycles well over 20mph, even as a kid.
----------------------------------------
Don Binns
had one of those 20" sting rays when i was in jr. high. also the local
cops were friends instead of bad guys. one was parked, gunning a big
downhill road, so we talked and i got to see how the radar gun worked.
he then asked me how fast i thought i could go on the bike and the
"test" was on. i guessed 20 mph when i got back from my "run". he said
i'd done that going up hill (it was a steep, sledding hill, if it iced
in the winter).
--
Mark Johnson, Ft. Worth, TX
Calgary
2005-03-01 03:20:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bownse
had one of those 20" sting rays when i was in jr. high. also the local
cops were friends instead of bad guys. one was parked, gunning a big
downhill road, so we talked and i got to see how the radar gun worked.
he then asked me how fast i thought i could go on the bike and the
"test" was on. i guessed 20 mph when i got back from my "run". he said
i'd done that going up hill (it was a steep, sledding hill, if it iced
in the winter).
Well my bicycling days pre date police radar so I couldn't confirm my
speed. But my first taste of road rash came on an abrupt get off of a
bike similar to your 20" sting ray. I am sure my doctor of the day
would attest I had to be going faster than 20 mph.


----------------------------------------

Don Binns
2000 - Yamaha Venture Millennium Edition
84 - Virago 1000

You start with a bag full of luck and an empty bag of experience. The trick is to fill the bag of experience before you empty the bag of luck

http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/reeky.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/banff.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/kananaskis.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/walkercalgary.htm
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/calgarybrowning.htm
Stephen!
2005-03-01 02:33:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Biff Bentley
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle speeds.
Try this:

Get on a bicycle.
Pedal it as fast as you can.
TURN the handlebars to the right.
Wonder to yourself, as you pick yourself up off the road, why it went left
instead of right...
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Tim
2005-03-01 02:36:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen!
Post by Biff Bentley
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle speeds.
Get on a bicycle.
Pedal it as fast as you can.
TURN the handlebars to the right.
Wonder to yourself, as you pick yourself up off the road, why it went left
instead of right...
You can do that at 3mph, 5 mph, 7mph, or 30mph. You can do it on a bike or a
motorcycle. The results will be the same.

Now, at one or two mph, the bike or motocycle *might* turn right, of you balance
is good enough....

Tim Morrow, Herndon, Virginia
--
'04 FLTRI
'99 Speed Triple
'72 TR6RV
http://users.erols.com/tomorrow
http://www.reeky.org/gallery/Tim
Stephen!
2005-03-01 07:53:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
You can do that at 3mph, 5 mph, 7mph, or 30mph. You can do it on a
bike or a motorcycle. The results will be the same.
SHHHHHH!!!! I was waiting for the report back... ;)
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Biff Bentley
2005-03-01 03:00:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stephen!
Post by Biff Bentley
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle speeds.
Get on a bicycle.
Pedal it as fast as you can.
TURN the handlebars to the right.
Wonder to yourself, as you pick yourself up off the road, why it went left
instead of right...
--
Well,,I pedal pretty slow I guess,,but here's this....

"At very slow speeds we steer a motorcycle by turning the handlebar in the
direction we wish to go. We can only do that at speeds of less than 5 mph.
(My 20 mph number was wrong). At any higher speed we do the exact opposite,"

http://www.msgroup.org/TIP048.html

So,, I guess maybe you can countersteer a bicycle, I don't really remember
riding a bike as a kid, I do remember some glorious wipe outs though.
Stephen!
2005-03-01 07:54:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Biff Bentley
So,, I guess maybe you can countersteer a bicycle, I don't really
remember riding a bike as a kid, I do remember some glorious wipe outs
though.
Most people do it without realizing it... When they do learn what they've
been doing all along many people have problems because they start thinking
about it too much...
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Keith Schiffner
2005-03-01 03:39:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Biff Bentley
On Mon, 28 Feb 2005 19:28:37 -0500, Tim
Post by Tim
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering
isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about
it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it,
as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or
another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had
not heard of countersteering
before.
I think most of us picked it up as kids riding
a bicycle. I can't
remember the first time I heard the term
counter steering but it was
well after I started riding.
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle
speeds. The number I was told was under 20 mph.
I'm sure of it, i read it on the internet!
Depends on the vehicle and 20mph was cruising on a
bicycle when I was a young lad...
--
Keith Schiffner
Assistant to the Assistant Undersecretary of the
Ministry of Silly Walks.
"terrorist organization" is a redundancy
Ben Kaufman
2005-03-01 12:56:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Biff Bentley
Post by Calgary
Post by Tim
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it, as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had not heard of
countersteering
before.
I think most of us picked it up as kids riding a bicycle. I can't
remember the first time I heard the term counter steering but it was
well after I started riding.
You don't have to counter-steer at kid bicycle speeds. The number I was told
was under 20 mph. I'm sure of it, i read it on the internet!
Isn't the internet great? How else are we going to lean about the marriage of
between children to dogs?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3004930.stm

Ben
Chuck Rhode
2005-03-01 23:01:08 UTC
Permalink
Ben Kaufman wrote this on Tue, 01 Mar 2005 07:56:36 -0500. My reply
is below.
Isn't the internet great? How else are we going to lean about the
marriage of children to dogs?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3004930.stm
Normally, I don't listen to the voices in my head, but, today, they
are singing this song, which has something to do with north-central
India and is perhaps a decadent German re-echo of "Ave Imperatrix." I
don't speak or spell German, and getting the translation right for
this piece was harder than other Brecht selections I tackled in
college:

http://www.excel.net/~crhode/Snaps/CannonSong.html
--
.. Chuck Rhode, Sheboygan, WI
.. 1979 Honda Goldwing GL1000 (Geraldine)
.. 1978 Honda Goldwing GL1000 (Fenris)
.. http://www.excel.net/~crhode/RockyGnashtoothsWeather/
.. 25°F. Wind NNW 10 mph. Cloudy.
Stephen!
2005-03-02 02:42:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Kaufman
Isn't the internet great? How else are we going to lean about the
marriage of between children to dogs?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3004930.stm
They's trying to pass a law in Ha-why-ya to make it illegal to kill a dog
and eat it...

No mention about laws protecting chickens, cows, or pigs...
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Keith Schiffner
2005-03-02 03:14:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chuck Rhode
Ben Kaufman
Post by Ben Kaufman
Isn't the internet great? How else are we
going to lean about the
marriage of between children to dogs?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3004930.stm
They's trying to pass a law in Ha-why-ya to make
it illegal to kill a dog
and eat it...
Wow! Talk about culturally insensative! Sheesh,
dog is good grilled but best in a stew so the
stupid round eyes DON'T know what they are eating.
Post by Chuck Rhode
No mention about laws protecting chickens, cows,
or pigs...
Yeah what about protecting those cute critters?
XS11E
2005-03-02 04:23:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Keith Schiffner
No mention about laws protecting chickens, cows, or pigs...
Yeah what about protecting those cute critters?
We need them critters for food. If God/Allah/Jehovah/yourdeityhere
didn't want us eating them, he/she/it wouldn't have made them so TASTY!

(and for the non-tasty, there's ketchup!)
Keith Schiffner
2005-03-02 14:05:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by XS11E
Post by Keith Schiffner
Post by Stephen!
No mention about laws protecting chickens,
cows, or pigs...
Yeah what about protecting those cute critters?
We need them critters for food. If
God/Allah/Jehovah/yourdeityhere
didn't want us eating them, he/she/it wouldn't
have made them so TASTY!
(and for the non-tasty, there's ketchup!)
ergo my comments about dog. Also one is lead to
believe that cat tastes like chicken and that
equine flesh is better than bovine. mmm, roast
pinto!
--
Keith Schiffner
History does not record anywhere at any time a
religion that has any rational basis. Religion is
a crutch for people not strong enough to stand up
to the unknown without help. But, like dandruff,
most people do have a religion and spend time and
money on it and seem to derive considerable
pleasure from fiddling with it.
Robert Heinlein

Follow your own god whether it be hairy thunderer
or cosmic muffin.
Turby
2005-03-02 17:55:39 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 01 Mar 2005 07:56:36 -0500, Ben Kaufman
Post by Ben Kaufman
Isn't the internet great? How else are we going to lean about the marriage of
between children to dogs?
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/south_asia/3004930.stm
The only thing strange about that is the age of the girl. Lots of guys
marry real dogs.
--
Turby the Turbosurfer
Beav
2005-03-02 00:18:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it, as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had not heard of
countersteering
before.
Granted the "buzzword" is quite new, but having had it explained by his son,
surely Dad would've realised that he'd been doing it when he rode back in
his youth?

I think it's probably only within the last couple of years that I've heard
of countersteering (as a name) but I've done it since forever ago, and I
didn't need a map to point out that it wasn't a new thing from a riding
perspective.

Beav
Ben Kaufman
2005-03-02 00:28:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beav
Post by Tim
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it, as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had not heard of
countersteering
before.
Granted the "buzzword" is quite new, but having had it explained by his son,
surely Dad would've realised that he'd been doing it when he rode back in
his youth?
I think it's probably only within the last couple of years that I've heard
of countersteering (as a name) but I've done it since forever ago, and I
didn't need a map to point out that it wasn't a new thing from a riding
perspective.
Beav
I'm pretty sure they were using the term back in the late 70s when I had a
subscription to one of the cycle mags.

Ben
Tostada
2005-03-02 03:50:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beav
Post by Tim
Post by Beav
I find that VERY strange. Countersteering isn't new, in fact it's as old as
riding itself and yet he didn't know about it? I wonder how he got round
corners in those bygone days?
Countersteered w/o realizing he was doing it, as was the case with 100% of the
experienced riders who, for one reason or another, took the basic riders course
over the 13 years that I taught it, and who had not heard of
countersteering
before.
Granted the "buzzword" is quite new, but having had it explained by his son,
surely Dad would've realised that he'd been doing it when he rode back in
his youth?
As a parent, you get used to feigning polite interest when your children
try to teach you to suck eggs.
Post by Beav
I think it's probably only within the last couple of years that I've heard
of countersteering (as a name) but I've done it since forever ago, and I
didn't need a map to point out that it wasn't a new thing from a riding
perspective.
I heard the term in Bicycling! magazine in the early 70's, in regards to
how bicycle racers turn. They also covered progressive braking
techniques. When I took a riding course
(http://www.ottawamotorcycle.ca/index.shtml) in 1974, they included
countersteering in the lectures. It wasn't taught in the skills sessions
until a few years later.

Like sex, people must have been doing it before the book came out.
Phil Scott
2005-03-02 05:43:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tostada
As a parent, you get used to feigning polite interest when
your children
Post by Tostada
try to teach you to suck eggs.
hahahahhaha ... nice one.

Phil Scott
Phil Scott
2005-02-28 22:11:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jason
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle
after a few
Post by Jason
Post by Suzuki Ninja
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF
basic
Post by Jason
Post by Suzuki Ninja
refresher course?
Well, my dad had not rode a bike in 20+ years. I bought my
vn800 and he
Post by Jason
wanted to ride it around the block. Took him a couple of
trips to get
Post by Jason
used to it again but after about 15 minutes he was scraping
the pegs
Post by Jason
going around corners and having a great time. Then I made
him get off
Post by Jason
and now he want's a Nomad. So yeah he was very rusty but the
rust
Post by Jason
worked it's way loose pretty quick.
Tom Devol, a well known board track racer in from the 20's
(they did over 100 mph the board tracks with leather
helmuts)... asked to ride my new 500cc triumph...he got on it,
asked where the throttle and shift lever was, marveling that
it had a foot shift...asked about the pattern.. then kicked
over, snicked it into first gear, hit second at about 50 mph
headed into a left only square corner with a 6" high curb
(radiused).. he stayed wide into turn, laid it way over so the
wheels tracked on the curb... went down road a few more
blocks... came back set the bike on its side stand and said
'nice bike'.


Some folks have it, some don't. it took me 2 years to regain
my skills after a 20 year lay off.... it was way beyond rusty.
Id lost at least 90% of my previous ability.


Phil Scott
Cam Penner
2005-02-25 06:36:38 UTC
Permalink
In article <1109311358.065420.17290
@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>, ***@yahoo.com
says...
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Look at the accident stats for the Born Again Bikers.
--
Cam
'89 RZ 350
j***@hotmail.com
2005-02-25 17:29:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cam Penner
In article <1109311358.065420.17290
@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>, ***@yahoo.com
says...
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Look at the accident stats for the Born Again Bikers.
I've ridden with quite a few of these BABs and I have to say that the
majority have pretty atrocious skill levels. I can't say for sure if
their skills atrophied or not. It's quite possible that they never had
any skills in the first place. Many of them relate their previous
experience as having owned and rode a small displacement bike for local
transportation in their college days, which lasted only as long as it
took for them to afford a cage. Seeing these guys hauling hauling
huge, chrome laden, large displacement machines on mountain twisties
can be frightening.

John
Alan Moore
2005-03-01 01:40:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by j***@hotmail.com
Post by Cam Penner
In article <1109311358.065420.17290
@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com>, ***@yahoo.com
says...
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the
bike
Post by Cam Penner
Post by Suzuki Ninja
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Look at the accident stats for the Born Again Bikers.
I've ridden with quite a few of these BABs and I have to say that the
majority have pretty atrocious skill levels. I can't say for sure if
their skills atrophied or not. It's quite possible that they never had
any skills in the first place.
<snip>

Good point, there. After all, why'd they give it up? Because" it" was
dangerous? When I started out, my older brother, who'd ridden for many
years told me "Those things are dangerous." He never owned a helmet,
any jacket he owned was a fashion statement, and he was a repeat
offender in the drunk driving department. For him "they" _were_
dangerous.

Al Moore
DoD 734
ufo
2005-02-25 06:41:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
SNIP<
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I don't think you lose ability to ride, you just don't ride as well and
it will take practice
to regain the skill, I stopped riding at age 22, I'm now 71 and started
riding again about
a year & a half ago, I could ride ok but didn't feel real comfortable so
I did take the MSF
refresher course. I now have 2 bikes and ride every day in north Tx
except when its raining
96 Virago 535 & 78 Suzuki GS750E
Saddlebag
2005-02-25 13:43:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by ufo
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
SNIP<
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I don't think you lose ability to ride, you just don't ride as well and
it will take practice
to regain the skill, I stopped riding at age 22, I'm now 71 and started
riding again about
a year & a half ago, I could ride ok but didn't feel real comfortable so
I did take the MSF
refresher course. I now have 2 bikes and ride every day in north Tx
except when its raining
96 Virago 535 & 78 Suzuki GS750E
You rock.
BJayKana
2005-02-28 16:37:05 UTC
Permalink
Someone compared ''the absence of time'' of getting back on a
motorcycle, to
''an Airline Pilot'' not having flown in a
fairly long period of time. They wondered who would board the Airline,
with the knowledge, that the Pilot was somewhat out of practice. My
answer is none.
I don't think that's much of a comparison.
If one, who hasn't rode a Bike in a while, straddles it, and rides away,
he is mainly responsible for his safety, unless, some fool, gets on as a
passenger.
Of course, the public would be at some risk, with the Biker out there,
on the roads.--(maybe?, not necessarilly)
I don't imagine, if the out-of-practice, Rider, incurs a possible
alteration, it would be quite the catastrophe of the Pilot of the
''airplane'' getting in a jam, mentally, 15,000 up^..(!)
Cam Penner
2005-02-28 17:45:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by BJayKana
Of course, the public would be at some risk, with the Biker out there,
on the roads.--(maybe?, not necessarilly)
I don't imagine, if the out-of-practice, Rider, incurs a possible
alteration, it would be quite the catastrophe of the Pilot of the
''airplane'' getting in a jam, mentally, 15,000 up^..(!)
Nor does the motorcyclist have the cushion of 15,000 ft of
recovery space. Nor does the motorcyclist have the luxury
of having 99%+ of the other "traffic" trained
professionally, and certified with meaningful tests and
regulations.
--
Cam
'89 RZ 350
Stephen!
2005-03-01 02:37:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by BJayKana
I don't think that's much of a comparison.
If one, who hasn't rode a Bike in a while, straddles it, and rides
away, he is mainly responsible for his safety, unless, some fool, gets
on as a passenger.
It's not so far off as you think. Even to act as a pilot in command of a
single seat aircraft a pilot must have had a Flight Review in the last
24 months... Think of it... Having to PROVE your ability to ride your
motorcycle every two years in order to be able to keep riding it... as
far as an Airline Pilot, there isn't a US airline out there that doesn't
require a flight check of their pilots every six months.
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Bob Mann
2005-02-26 13:24:24 UTC
Permalink
On Fri, 25 Feb 2005 00:41:37 -0600, "ufo" <avon33dotcomcast.net>
Post by ufo
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
SNIP<
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I don't think you lose ability to ride, you just don't ride as well and
it will take practice
to regain the skill, I stopped riding at age 22, I'm now 71 and started
riding again about
a year & a half ago, I could ride ok but didn't feel real comfortable so
I did take the MSF
refresher course. I now have 2 bikes and ride every day in north Tx
except when its raining
96 Virago 535 & 78 Suzuki GS750E
I agree with that. (And congrats for getting back in the game after 47
years)
I used to play soccer a lot, grew up with it.
A couple of years ago I started playing again.
Had I forgotten how? No, but I sure wasn't as good as I used to be.
A little slower, a whole lot less hand eye co-ordination.
Same with riding a bicycle and riding a motorcycle.
The things you used to be able to do easily and without deliberate
thought now require more effort and more thought which means that you
need to give yourself more room and more time.
Add in the fact that it will be a new bike to you and all the more
reason to take it slow and take a course whenever you can.
--
Bob Mann
Help save trees. Wipe your ass with an owl.
Beav
2005-03-02 00:22:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by ufo
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
SNIP<
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I don't think you lose ability to ride, you just don't ride as well and
it will take practice
to regain the skill, I stopped riding at age 22, I'm now 71 and started
riding again about
a year & a half ago, I could ride ok but didn't feel real comfortable so
I did take the MSF
refresher course. I now have 2 bikes and ride every day in north Tx
except when its raining
96 Virago 535 & 78 Suzuki GS750E
Way to go Pop, you deserve a medal:-)

I read recently about a guy who rode to Sturgis, some 800 miles, spent the
afternoon there and then turned around and rode back home. All on his Harley
RoadKing and at 81 years of age and apparently it rained all the way home
for him.

You've got years left to ride and I hope you enjoy every single one of them
as much as Mr 81.


Beav
Andrew
2005-02-25 06:53:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I feel like I lose it a little if I'm not on the bike at least every
couple of weeks. When I'm in my summer groove I'm much more confident
than I am in the 1st few rides of spring.
--
Andrew
00 Daytona
00 Speed Triple
Bike Guy Joe
2005-02-25 11:40:09 UTC
Permalink
Yes, every time spring comes around, I have to learn how to ride
again......that's why I'm still alive to give such flippant answers.
Saddlebag
2005-02-25 13:50:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Bike Guy Joe
Yes, every time spring comes around, I have to learn how to ride
again......that's why I'm still alive to give such flippant answers.
I think that's common. One needs to re-calibrate their senses after a
some time off. The specific question regarded loosing one's mind to the
point they forget which lever to use for braking, how to countersteer
etc. and requiring a coach to get them back up to speed.
I suppose that would be a function of how much you actually knew and
rode prior to the layoff...or if you smoked any really good weed, or
took a nice shot to the head.
Andrew
2005-02-25 18:27:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Saddlebag
Post by Bike Guy Joe
Yes, every time spring comes around, I have to learn how to ride
again......that's why I'm still alive to give such flippant answers.
I think that's common. One needs to re-calibrate their senses after a
some time off. The specific question regarded loosing one's mind to the
point they forget which lever to use for braking, how to countersteer
etc. and requiring a coach to get them back up to speed.
I suppose that would be a function of how much you actually knew and
rode prior to the layoff...or if you smoked any really good weed, or
took a nice shot to the head.
I'm gonna be drinking this tonight.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=369&item=6156997034&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW

My wife got me some for Valentine's day. This stuff could make you
forget which lever is the brake.
--
Andrew
00 Daytona
00 Speed Triple
mjt
2005-02-25 19:13:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew
I'm gonna be drinking this tonight.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=369&item=6156997034&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW
My wife got me some for Valentine's day.  This stuff could make you 
forget which lever is the brake.
... woo hoo !! pass it around!
--
<< http://michaeljtobler.homelinux.com/ >>
If you would understand your own age, read the works
of fiction produced in it. People in disguise speak freely.
Silicon Sam
2005-02-25 19:30:34 UTC
Permalink
I was without a bike for over 10 years, and when I went to visit my
brother in AZ, I bought his old Goldwing, and later that week drove it
close to 1000 miles back home. I personally felt like I hadn't ever
left riding bikes. I've put on 11K miles since then.
Andrew
2005-02-25 20:06:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by mjt
Post by Andrew
I'm gonna be drinking this tonight.
http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&category=369&item=6156997034&rd=1&ssPageName=WDVW
My wife got me some for Valentine's day. This stuff could make you
forget which lever is the brake.
... woo hoo !! pass it around!
Next time i'm in HOU, we'll get a bottle and pass it around. I'm sure
Mag and Duane would love it too!
--
Andrew
00 Daytona
00 Speed Triple
Beav
2005-03-02 00:25:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Andrew
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I feel like I lose it a little if I'm not on the bike at least every
couple of weeks. When I'm in my summer groove I'm much more confident
than I am in the 1st few rides of spring.
Lots of guys over here in the UK park their bikes for the winter, but I'm
not one of them. The bike needs a bit more cleaning and of course the
opportunities to ride aren't so common from December toApril, but I check
the weather every day and if it's not icy or snowing, I try to get a few
miles in. I'm too old to let the grass grow and the rust form, so it makes
sense to me.

Spent 3 hours servicing the bike today and tomorrow it's promising to be a
good day for hitting the road and not sliding along it:-))

Beav
Tim
2005-02-25 12:37:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
There is a difference between having the physical capacity to operate a
motorcycle and the ability to ride a motorcycle competently under varying
conditions with a minimum of risk.

The MSF class is not the ONLY way to remove rust, refresh ones skills, and get
an unbiased review of habits both good and bad.

However, for many riders it is the most easily accessable, most reasonably
priced, and quickest means to the above ends.
Iggy
2005-02-25 12:50:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
There is a difference between having the physical capacity to operate a
motorcycle and the ability to ride a motorcycle competently under varying
conditions with a minimum of risk.
The MSF class is not the ONLY way to remove rust, refresh ones skills, and get
an unbiased review of habits both good and bad.
However, for many riders it is the most easily accessable, most reasonably
priced, and quickest means to the above ends.
And probably the safest, for most folks. As I said in part of my post which
Ninja snipped, you're in a controlled environment under the watchful eyes of
a few instructors. They point out any deficiencies in your skills and help
you correct them.
Dave '97 F3
2005-02-25 13:23:19 UTC
Permalink
WOW - there is a whole lot of truth in this statement. This fact is what we
older riders, returning to riding after years of cages need to realize.
Post by Tim
There is a difference between having the physical capacity to operate a
motorcycle and the ability to ride a motorcycle competently under varying
conditions with a minimum of risk.
krusty kritter
2005-02-25 12:49:49 UTC
Permalink
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the >
bike after a decade or two of inactivity?

I find that I lose confidence, coordination, and muscle memory just
over the winter layoff, I need to go slow for the first few rides until
it all comes back to me...
Ben Kaufman
2005-02-25 13:48:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
It's like almost any other activity. Without practice you loose skill. Even
trolls can get rusty.

Ben
NZMSC
2005-02-25 19:28:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle
after a few years of inactivity? So bad that you must take
a $198 MSF basic refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid
dormant? 6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the
street After a year or more, I would be more than happy
to give the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only
two other riders who had been dormant for more than a
decade. Both picked up a permit, bought liter sized bikes,
and rode around without a hitch. Passing the CA DMV test
was another matter for them (as it would be for any
experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to
ride the bike after a decade or two of inactivity?
No, you don't lose the ability to ride a motorcycle (well,
not enough that it can't be regained in a very very short
time span).

What you do lose is much more dangerous. You lose judgement.

That's partly the reason why there are so many born again
bikers in the crash stats now. They are not used to the
handling capabilities of modern bikes and outride their skill
level, they haven't learnt many of the new techniques (ask a
born again biker what countersteering or riding to the
vanishing point is and he's likely to look at you blankly)
and they will usually have almost completely forgotten both
just how vulnerable one is on a bike and how painful it is to
crash - and how often car drivers "don't see" you.

And the latter is particularly dangerous ... as the crash
stats show.

Nope. You don't lose the ability to control the bike. You
lose judgement.
--
Allan Kirk,
Megarider Organisation,
(Saving motorcyclists' lives since 1971 )
www.megarider.com
XS11E
2005-02-25 19:59:02 UTC
Permalink
Post by NZMSC
No, you don't lose the ability to ride a motorcycle (well,
not enough that it can't be regained in a very very short
time span).
What you do lose is much more dangerous. You lose judgement.
I don't think anyone has mentioned another thing you lose and it's
equally important as judgment, that's vision.

I noticed in my 40s I wasn't seeing as well as I had when younger,
later when I had to wear glasses they caused their own problems.
Timberwoof
2005-02-26 02:21:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by XS11E
Post by NZMSC
No, you don't lose the ability to ride a motorcycle (well,
not enough that it can't be regained in a very very short
time span).
What you do lose is much more dangerous. You lose judgement.
I don't think anyone has mentioned another thing you lose and it's
equally important as judgment, that's vision.
I noticed in my 40s I wasn't seeing as well as I had when younger,
later when I had to wear glasses they caused their own problems.
I've been wearing glasses for nearsightedness all my life. I just graduated to
bifocals because I was starting to have trouble focusing up close.

The trick is to put the helmet on first, and then the glasses. ;-)
--
Timberwoof <me at timberwoof dot com>
faq: http://www.timberwoof.com/motorcycle/faq.shtml
sorry: http://www.sorryeverybody.com/gallery/200/
XS11E
2005-02-26 16:12:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Timberwoof
The trick is to put the helmet on first, and then the glasses.
If that were true, then God and Shoei wouldn't have given us flip up
helmets! <GD&R>

FWIW, my previous glasses had fairly large frames and wouldn't go
inside my full face helmet. I really like flip ups and that's all I
wore when I was still riding.
Ben Kaufman
2005-02-27 00:57:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by XS11E
Post by Timberwoof
The trick is to put the helmet on first, and then the glasses.
If that were true, then God and Shoei wouldn't have given us flip up
helmets! <GD&R>
FWIW, my previous glasses had fairly large frames and wouldn't go
inside my full face helmet. I really like flip ups and that's all I
wore when I was still riding.
Have I got good news for you :-)

http://www.bmezine.com/news/pubring/20041214.html

Ben
XS11E
2005-02-27 03:44:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ben Kaufman
Post by XS11E
FWIW, my previous glasses had fairly large frames and wouldn't go
inside my full face helmet. I really like flip ups and that's all
I wore when I was still riding.
Have I got good news for you :-)
http://www.bmezine.com/news/pubring/20041214.html
That's almost weird enough for Reeky.....
jim rozen
2005-02-25 20:19:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by NZMSC
Nope. You don't lose the ability to control the bike. You
lose judgement.
Heck, the squids around here lose both over the winter.
Or at least that's what it seems like when they all
wind up crashing early in the season.

Jim
--
==================================================
please reply to:
JRR(zero) at pkmfgvm4 (dot) vnet (dot) ibm (dot) com
==================================================
Ben Kaufman
2005-02-26 03:34:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by jim rozen
Post by NZMSC
Nope. You don't lose the ability to control the bike. You
lose judgement.
Heck, the squids around here lose both over the winter.
Or at least that's what it seems like when they all
wind up crashing early in the season.
Jim
Aw Jim, it's not their fault, it's that darn gravel/salt they've been laying
all winter. :-)

Ben
TomO
2005-02-25 22:33:59 UTC
Permalink
Suzuki Ninja wrote:
snip
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Hell, I find that I need to go through a quick refamiliarization process
just switching between my two bikes. They are very radically different
in handling, braking and feel that it would be disasterous to try and
ride one like it is the other.

-
TomO
'01 V-Star 1100 Classic
'84 Yamaha Venture Royale
Anthony Reeves
2005-02-25 23:32:54 UTC
Permalink
I use to ride quite a bit years ago. Then stopped for a 20 year break.

I just got a new bike a month ago and it all came back to me as soon as I
took the bike out for a ride.
I remembered everything, counter steering, braking, how to gauge curve
apexes. it was like just got back on after a short break from riding.

Sure I need to get use to the bike again, but if you truly love bikes you
never really forget them. sort of like your first love..
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Ari Rankum
2005-02-25 23:35:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anthony Reeves
Sure I need to get use to the bike again, but if you truly love bikes you
never really forget them. sort of like your first love..
I disagree. I've never had a mistress, and I don't want one. But I
think I know how having a mistress would feel.

I have experiences on my bikes that I would just never tell my wife
about. Ever.
another viewer
2005-02-26 02:36:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ari Rankum
I have experiences on my bikes that I would just never tell my wife
about. Ever.
so i take it she's not into pain and S&M
--
Iron Butt Assoc., WATR 4X, BL3 paparazzi, E.O.B.
R1100RT, R75/5
"If you are civil to the voluble, they will abuse your patience;
if brusque, your character." - Jonathon Swift
Stephen!
2005-02-26 08:52:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ari Rankum
I have experiences on my bikes that I would just never tell my wife
about. Ever.
There is absolutely no reason to scare her that way.
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Tim
2005-02-26 00:56:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anthony Reeves
I use to ride quite a bit years ago. Then stopped for a 20 year break.
I just got a new bike a month ago and it all came back to me as soon as I
took the bike out for a ride.
I remembered everything, counter steering, braking, how to gauge curve
apexes. it was like just got back on after a short break from riding.
Sure I need to get use to the bike again, but if you truly love bikes you
never really forget them. sort of like your first love..
Amazing!
Ben Kaufman
2005-02-26 03:39:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Anthony Reeves
I use to ride quite a bit years ago. Then stopped for a 20 year break.
I just got a new bike a month ago and it all came back to me as soon as I
took the bike out for a ride.
I remembered everything, counter steering, braking, how to gauge curve
apexes. it was like just got back on after a short break from riding.
Sure I need to get use to the bike again, but if you truly love bikes you
never really forget them. sort of like your first love..
When you regain your confidence, that's the time to really start being careful.

Ben
RA
2005-02-27 13:45:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
No.
Beav
2005-02-28 11:41:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I reckon you'd have to be REALLY inept to totally lose the ability. You'd be
rusty, but that wouldn't last long, but I feel the main stumbling blocks
would be the massive increase in the performance of modern bikes over the
older generation machines, and the increase in traffic (not to mention the
inability for cagers to see bikes)

It's all well and good saying "I rode when I was a kid, so I can ride now"
but WHAT did you ride as a kid? Probably something with less horsepower than
a modern day 125 or maybe a 250, so when you lever your old legs over the
seat of a litre bike churning out over 100bhp, you're going to be in a
different world.

I'd highly recomend a course for anyone who's had a layoff of any REAL
length, and if said individual doesn't WANT to, then on his head be it.

Beav
Mike Schenk
2005-02-28 12:01:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Beav
I'd highly recomend a course for anyone who's had a layoff of any REAL
length, and if said individual doesn't WANT to, then on his head be it.
Both my father and my uncle rode motorbikes when they were young. My
uncle picked it up again 10 years ago or so, after a 20 year break I
guess.

Bought a bike, fell on the second day, rode it again for some weeks
until he had an accident where his bike smashed into a car around the
corner. The driver of the other car gave a statement to the police that
"he saw a riderless bike come around the corner, with the rider running
after it and the bike smashed into his car".

What I assume happened is that my uncle came around the corner, saw the
car, panicked, skidded and then fell of the bike just before it smashed
the car.

Anyway, it's a typical example of what happens when someone knows the
motions of riding a bike but is not really in control of it.

When I started riding a few years later both my uncle and my father were
ogling my bike (Kawa ZR7S at the time) but both agreed that it would not
be wise for them to try it. (Which saved me the dilemma on how to bring
it to them that I didn't want them to ride it anyway,)

Last year I switched to a Pan European and they were again ogling it but
said rightaway that this one was twice as big as what they were used to
and they would never try it.

I guess, if they really wanted to, they should take a few lessons. Learn
how to control the bike again and also learn how to behave in traffic.
When they last rode a bike, traffic was quiet over here and now it's a
nightmare at some times.

Mike
Mark Olson
2005-02-28 12:54:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Schenk
When I started riding a few years later both my uncle and my father were
ogling my bike (Kawa ZR7S at the time) but both agreed that it would not
be wise for them to try it. (Which saved me the dilemma on how to bring
it to them that I didn't want them to ride it anyway,)
Would you have a similar dilemma if you hooked up with a new girlfriend,
over whether or not you should share her out? After all, your uncle
and father probably also know how to ride one of those, too...

I cannot for the life of me figure out why people expect to be allowed
to hop onto their friend's new bike, when they haven't ridden for years,
and the last time they rode, they probably crashed. Even more puzzling
is why some bike owners take any time whatsoever to agonize over how to
just say 'No'.
--
Mark '01 SV650S '99 EX250-F13 '86 GL1200A '81 CM400T
Stephen!
2005-03-01 02:40:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mike Schenk
What I assume happened is that my uncle came around the corner, saw the
car, panicked, skidded and then fell of the bike just before it smashed
the car.
Sounds like he forgot the most important part of "Layin 'er down!"...
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Bruno
2005-03-01 01:36:16 UTC
Permalink
http://www.wisinfo.com/postcrescent/news/archive/local_19525024.shtml



--
There are only two valid activities in this world:
personally attending to the injured and hungry,
and picking fights in newsgroups.
- Lore Sjöberg
Phil Scott
2005-02-28 22:03:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle
after a few
Post by Suzuki Ninja
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF
basic
Post by Suzuki Ninja
refresher course?
You can forget and loose the muscle memory of at least 90% of
your old skills over 20 years by my recent personal
experience..its taken 2 years to regain most of what I had.
the first 6 months I was a near fatal hazard to myself.

However recently I took 6 months off of riding and got back
on, and a day had come back to normal..
so its a function of time for sure.


Phil Scott
Post by Suzuki Ninja
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid
dormant?
Post by Suzuki Ninja
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the
street
Post by Suzuki Ninja
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only
two other
Post by Suzuki Ninja
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both
picked up a
Post by Suzuki Ninja
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a
hitch.
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it
would be for
Post by Suzuki Ninja
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of
this
Post by Suzuki Ninja
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to
ride the bike
Post by Suzuki Ninja
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Troy the Troll
2005-03-01 01:53:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phil Scott
However recently I took 6 months off of riding and got back
on, and a day had come back to normal..
so its a function of time for sure.
Phil Scott
Sure you took 6 months off.....gee....what a surprise....and then what did
you do? Took another 6 months off......to research how the average toilet
cleaning guvmint worker retires on $100G's a year? Blithering wacko, get
with the program already, provide a reference to ANY damn thing you say
because sure as shootin its so much garbage.
ufo
2005-03-01 02:00:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Troy the Troll
Sure you took 6 months off.....gee....what a surprise....and then what did
you do? Took another 6 months off......to research how the average toilet
cleaning guvmint worker retires on $100G's a year? Blithering wacko, get
with the program already, provide a reference to ANY damn thing you say
because sure as shootin its so much garbage.
So Troy, What are you? I mean besides a fucking idiot
Tim
2005-03-01 02:07:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by ufo
Post by Troy the Troll
Sure you took 6 months off.....gee....what a surprise....and then what did
you do? Took another 6 months off......to research how the average toilet
cleaning guvmint worker retires on $100G's a year? Blithering wacko, get
with the program already, provide a reference to ANY damn thing you say
because sure as shootin its so much garbage.
So Troy, What are you? I mean besides a fucking idiot
Aye, there's the rub then, innit?

Tim Morrow, Herndon, Virginia
--
'04 FLTRI
'99 Speed Triple
'72 TR6RV
http://users.erols.com/tomorrow
http://www.reeky.org/gallery/Tim
Troy the Troll
2005-03-01 03:27:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by ufo
Post by Troy the Troll
Sure you took 6 months off.....gee....what a surprise....and then what did
you do? Took another 6 months off......to research how the average toilet
cleaning guvmint worker retires on $100G's a year? Blithering wacko, get
with the program already, provide a reference to ANY damn thing you say
because sure as shootin its so much garbage.
So Troy, What are you? I mean besides a fucking idiot
I always like it when bashing the wacko's brings the weasels with poor
language skills outta the closet.
Tim
2005-03-01 03:30:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Troy the Troll
Post by ufo
Post by Troy the Troll
Sure you took 6 months off.....gee....what a surprise....and then what did
you do? Took another 6 months off......to research how the average toilet
cleaning guvmint worker retires on $100G's a year? Blithering wacko, get
with the program already, provide a reference to ANY damn thing you say
because sure as shootin its so much garbage.
So Troy, What are you? I mean besides a fucking idiot
I always like it when bashing the wacko's brings the weasels with poor
language skills outta the closet.
That 'splains the apostrophe, I s'pose.
Troy the Troll
2005-03-01 03:39:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Post by Troy the Troll
Post by ufo
So Troy, What are you? I mean besides a fucking idiot
I always like it when bashing the wacko's brings the weasels with poor
language skills outta the closet.
That 'splains the apostrophe, I s'pose.
It explains nothing, but don't stop me from interrupting your punctuation
correcting tendencies. Someone has to be a human spell checker/grammar
corrector if only for their own piece of mind I suppose....

I suppose the cross posting nature of this particular thread wandered over
into Phils more regular tinfoil zone, so I'm hardly surprised by what comes
out of the woodwork.
Tim
2005-03-01 03:45:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Troy the Troll
Post by Tim
Post by Troy the Troll
Post by ufo
So Troy, What are you? I mean besides a fucking idiot
I always like it when bashing the wacko's brings the weasels with poor
language skills outta the closet.
That 'splains the apostrophe, I s'pose.
It explains nothing, but don't stop me from interrupting your punctuation
correcting tendencies. Someone has to be a human spell checker/grammar
corrector if only for their own piece of mind I suppose....
I suppose the cross posting nature of this particular thread wandered over
into Phils more regular tinfoil zone, so I'm hardly surprised by what comes
out of the woodwork.
"ufo" was right. Only a fucking idiot castigates folks for poor language skills
while demonstrating poor language skills, then responds by casting aspersions on
folks who call attention to his own pot, kettle, black tendencies.

Heh. At least you've got your own handle right; I'll give you that.

Tim Morrow, Herndon, Virginia
--
'04 FLTRI
'99 Speed Triple
'72 TR6RV
http://users.erols.com/tomorrow
http://www.reeky.org/gallery/Tim
Troy the Troll
2005-03-01 05:27:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tim
Only a fucking idiot castigates folks for poor language skills
while demonstrating poor language skills,
hardly....using poor english while baiting those who are anal about proper
english is just habit....again....dangling superficiality to catch out those
without any depth is like second nature.

Bashing Phil for another BS OT rant simply means I am rational and tired of
the lies he spews with such voluminous regularity.
Stephen!
2005-03-01 07:59:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Troy the Troll
hardly....using poor english while baiting those who are anal about
proper english is just habit....again....dangling superficiality to
catch out those without any depth is like second nature.
You are PeeWee Herman and I claim my bottle of^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^H^Hbig talking
chair...

(For those of you a bit slow on the uptake this loser is claiming to have
purposly made the errors to get bites on her trolls. AKA the "I meant to
do that!" syndrom...)
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
David
2005-03-01 18:39:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Lose the ability? No.

But it's the same as when you don't put ice skakes on for a while.
You are definitely a bit spotty with your style.

I had to remind myself where the foot brake & gears were located....

My biggest problem (once I turned 60) was that my head didn't seem to
be able to twist around as far as it used to when glancing over my
shoulder......

David
Adysthemic
2005-03-03 01:36:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by David
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
Lose the ability? No.
But it's the same as when you don't put ice skakes on for a while.
You are definitely a bit spotty with your style.
I had to remind myself where the foot brake & gears were located....
My biggest problem (once I turned 60) was that my head didn't seem to
be able to twist around as far as it used to when glancing over my
shoulder......
David
\
LOL THAT was my biggest problem as well. I had to turn my body to see. For a
time I foolishly relyed on my mirrors
only because it hurt less, and discovered a blind spot. Good thing I always
accelerate a bit when lane changing and stay to the side, or I'd have had a
close encounter of the third kind, :>). I spent a half hour a day after
that, for a time doing twist yoga sitting on the center stand until I could
turn
my head properly,hehhe,Adysthemic
Michel Clasquin
2005-03-01 21:26:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
I spent nine years setting myself up in a new career and not having
money for a bike. Then I bought a 20 year old BMW.

Got on it and roared away, no problem. Braking and turning skills
returned instantly. Then after a few blocks the bike died (in the
middle of afternoon traffic, of course) and it took me an hour to
figure out how to get it started again.

Note to former self: Old bikes with carburettors have these things
called fuel taps that you have to turn through 90 degrees before you
roar off.
Stephen!
2005-03-02 02:45:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michel Clasquin
Note to former self: Old bikes with carburettors have these things
called fuel taps that you have to turn through 90 degrees before you
roar off.
FINE-C

Fuel
Ignition
Neutral
Engine Cut Off Switch
Clutch
--
IBA# 11465
http://imagesdesavions.com
Adysthemic
2005-03-03 01:28:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Suzuki Ninja
Is it true that you lose the ability to ride a motorcycle after a few
years of inactivity? So bad that you must take a $198 MSF basic
refresher course?
In the famous CA DMV thread, "Iggy" just stated
Hmmm, how long have those experienced riders laid dormant?
6 months? A year? 3 years?
IMNSHO, if you don't use it, you lose it.
There have been a few times when I haven't ridden my bike
for a few weeks and I feel a little rusty out on the street
After a year or more, I would be more than happy to give
the MSF $150 for a "refresher" course.
I ask this question because I personally only know of only two other
riders who had been dormant for more than a decade. Both picked up a
permit, bought liter sized bikes, and rode around without a hitch.
Passing the CA DMV test was another matter for them (as it would be for
any experienced rider) but that's totally not the topic of this
question.
Did you or someone you know actually LOSE the ability to ride the bike
after a decade or two of inactivity?
I rode from age 9ish to around age 30ish or so. During that period I rode
dirt and street. I stopped riding until last year.
I'm 51 now. I picked up an older BMW and my wife and I
started taking Friday trips. I've been riding again since
June 2004. I was an above average rider when I quit. Just in the last 6
weeks or so doI feel like "I got my chops back" What I mean by that is
almost all of my "body memory" has returned now. For a while I had to be
conscious of almost everything. Now I find that my "instincts" have
returned. Now I just concentrate on "smoothness".I don't go as fast as I
used to,most of the time. Just the correct line..Zen,heh, the machine as an
extension of the mind. None of that "chatter" ,now I do this,now that....So
roughly 4000 miles to return to normal
minus the slower response time of age. So no, if you reached a high level of
proficiency before you quit you don't forget,Adysthemic
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