Discussion:
and the winner is -
(too old to reply)
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 00:53:06 UTC
Permalink
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in and
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and I
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I don't know im thinking tomorrow go to the DMV and get my license. can
anyone guess where I might go Saturday?
Shadow.
Phyloe
2003-10-10 03:18:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in and
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
Oh? What bad things? I have a Magna and have not found anything I would
call bad. It is a cruiser and does that as well as any if not better. What
bad?
Post by Shadow Spirit
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and I
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I can do a 180 on narrow county roads. Tight turns take practice,
practice, practice.


Phyloe
Dog Exhaust
2003-10-10 04:51:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phyloe
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in
and
Post by Shadow Spirit
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
Oh? What bad things? I have a Magna and have not found anything I would
call bad. It is a cruiser and does that as well as any if not better. What
bad?
Post by Shadow Spirit
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser
and
Post by Phyloe
I
Post by Shadow Spirit
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I can do a 180 on narrow county roads. Tight turns take practice,
practice, practice.
Tight turns require a narrow mind. That's why you are so good at them.

The Dog
P.Roehling
2003-10-10 05:31:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dog Exhaust
Tight turns require a narrow mind. That's why you are so good at them.
Note for your future posts: insults are much more effective when they make
some sort of sense.

P.
Brennan
2003-10-10 15:15:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by P.Roehling
Post by Dog Exhaust
Tight turns require a narrow mind. That's why you are so good at them.
Note for your future posts: insults are much more effective when they make
some sort of sense.
I dunno, if you sit back and think about it, and take a real deep drag
on the doobie, it begins to. Um. Make ah, sense, kinda. Yeah. What
were we talking about?

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
P.Roehling
2003-10-10 18:41:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brennan
I dunno, if you sit back and think about it, and take a real deep drag
on the doobie, it begins to. Um. Make ah, sense, kinda. Yeah. What
were we talking about?
Dunno. Got anything to eat?

P.
Phyloe
2003-10-10 13:01:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dog Exhaust
Post by Phyloe
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in
and
Post by Shadow Spirit
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about
this
Post by Phyloe
Post by Shadow Spirit
bike as well as some good.
Oh? What bad things? I have a Magna and have not found anything I would
call bad. It is a cruiser and does that as well as any if not better. What
bad?
Post by Shadow Spirit
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser
and
Post by Phyloe
I
Post by Shadow Spirit
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I can do a 180 on narrow county roads. Tight turns take practice,
practice, practice.
Tight turns require a narrow mind. That's why you are so good at them.
The Dog
That's the best you can do? You should be embarrassed! As flames go that
was just poor. I suggest you lurk awhile and see how some of the masters do
it and take notes.
Phyloe
Steven Botts
2003-10-10 04:50:22 UTC
Permalink
--
To contact me by e-mail, insert a "t" between the first two letters of my
address.
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in and
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and I
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I don't know im thinking tomorrow go to the DMV and get my license. can
anyone guess where I might go Saturday?
Shadow.
I have a '94 Magna 750 and I'm very pleased with it. I just returned from a
6000 mile road trip on mine that took me through deserts, mountains, heat,
cold, heavy traffic, and many hours of sustained high-speed riding with no
trouble at all.

Lubing the drive chain on a bike like the Magna, which has no centerstand
can be a bitch. After many repetitions of the roll-and-squirt method, I
finally found an easier way.

First, find a fairly empty parking lot. Then take off your left sidecover so
you can see the chain. Then place a can of your favorite chain lube between
your thighs, start the bike, and drive slowly forward.
Going as slowly as you can, take the chain lube in your left hand, aim it at
the moving chain and give it a good long squirt.

It's easy and relatively clean. Just don't ride too long with your head down
watching the chain.

You will have to adjust the chain once in awhile, but probably not as often
as you think. I adjusted mine before leaving home and didn't have to do it
again for the entire trip.

Steve
Ted Reber
2003-10-10 16:49:13 UTC
Permalink
"Steven Botts" <***@texas.net> wrote in message news:***@texas.net...
<snip>
Post by Steven Botts
I have a '94 Magna 750 and I'm very pleased with it. I just returned from a
6000 mile road trip on mine that took me through deserts, mountains, heat,
cold, heavy traffic, and many hours of sustained high-speed riding with no
trouble at all.
Lubing the drive chain on a bike like the Magna, which has no centerstand
can be a bitch. After many repetitions of the roll-and-squirt method, I
finally found an easier way.
First, find a fairly empty parking lot. Then take off your left sidecover so
you can see the chain. Then place a can of your favorite chain lube between
your thighs, start the bike, and drive slowly forward.
Going as slowly as you can, take the chain lube in your left hand, aim it at
the moving chain and give it a good long squirt.
It's easy and relatively clean. Just don't ride too long with your head down
watching the chain.
You will have to adjust the chain once in awhile, but probably not as often
as you think. I adjusted mine before leaving home and didn't have to do it
again for the entire trip.
Steve
(Doh!) OR! You can go to SAM's Club (or another store that carries
them)
and buy yourself a motorcycle/ATV lift ---- one I got cost $75 and can
easily lift my ST1300 (once the bottom fairing sections are removed). To
really
spoil yourself, get a little shop stool to sit on while you work (Torin Big
Red
pneumatic in my case --- $19 at the same SAM's Club).

Ted from Pa.
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 17:11:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Reber
<snip>
Post by Steven Botts
I have a '94 Magna 750 and I'm very pleased with it. I just returned
from
Post by Ted Reber
a
Post by Steven Botts
6000 mile road trip on mine that took me through deserts, mountains, heat,
cold, heavy traffic, and many hours of sustained high-speed riding with
no
Post by Steven Botts
trouble at all.
Lubing the drive chain on a bike like the Magna, which has no centerstand
can be a bitch. After many repetitions of the roll-and-squirt method, I
finally found an easier way.
First, find a fairly empty parking lot. Then take off your left
sidecover
Post by Ted Reber
so
Post by Steven Botts
you can see the chain. Then place a can of your favorite chain lube
between
Post by Steven Botts
your thighs, start the bike, and drive slowly forward.
Going as slowly as you can, take the chain lube in your left hand, aim
it
Post by Ted Reber
at
Post by Steven Botts
the moving chain and give it a good long squirt.
It's easy and relatively clean. Just don't ride too long with your head
down
Post by Steven Botts
watching the chain.
You will have to adjust the chain once in awhile, but probably not as
often
Post by Steven Botts
as you think. I adjusted mine before leaving home and didn't have to do it
again for the entire trip.
Steve
(Doh!) OR! You can go to SAM's Club (or another store that carries
them)
and buy yourself a motorcycle/ATV lift ---- one I got cost $75 and can
easily lift my ST1300 (once the bottom fairing sections are removed). To
really
spoil yourself, get a little shop stool to sit on while you work (Torin Big
Red
pneumatic in my case --- $19 at the same SAM's Club).
Ted from Pa.
you know that is something to look into - I would have to see how big one
is.
any good sites? just to check one that you feel is good and as small as
possible.
thank you
Tom
Ted Reber
2003-10-13 03:46:51 UTC
Permalink
<snip>
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
(Doh!) OR! You can go to SAM's Club (or another store that carries
them) and buy yourself a motorcycle/ATV lift ---- one I got cost $75 and
can
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
easily lift my ST1300 (once the bottom fairing sections are removed).
To
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
really spoil yourself, get a little shop stool to sit on while you work
(Torin
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
Big Red pneumatic in my case --- $19 at the same SAM's Club).
Ted from Pa.
you know that is something to look into - I would have to see how big one
is. any good sites? just to check one that you feel is good and as small
as
Post by Shadow Spirit
possible.
thank you
Tom
Don't have any sites to site, but mine comes from a company called
Larin.
Most of them are not too large size-wise, outside of the outriggers they
often
use for stability, but they are pretty heavy. They have to be sturdy enough
to lift 1,000 pounds more or less, plus their weight helps keep them
stable in addition to the outriggers. Mine is about 2 ft. by 1-1/2 ft. and
6 to
7 inches tall when collapsed and the outriggers folded in.

Ted
Ted Reber
2003-10-13 03:55:01 UTC
Permalink
<snip>
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
(Doh!) OR! You can go to SAM's Club (or another store that carries
them) and buy yourself a motorcycle/ATV lift ---- one I got cost $75 and
can
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
easily lift my ST1300 (once the bottom fairing sections are removed).
To
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
really spoil yourself, get a little shop stool to sit on while you work
(Torin
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
Big Red pneumatic in my case --- $19 at the same SAM's Club).
Ted from Pa.
you know that is something to look into - I would have to see how big one
is. any good sites? just to check one that you feel is good and as small
as
Post by Shadow Spirit
possible.
thank you
Tom
Don't have any sites to site, but mine comes from a company called
Larin.
Most of them are not too large size-wise, outside of the outriggers they
often
use for stability, but they are pretty heavy. They have to be sturdy enough
to lift 1,000 pounds more or less, plus their weight helps keep them
stable in addition to the outriggers. Mine is about 2 ft. by 1-1/2 ft. and
6 to
7 inches tall when collapsed and the outriggers folded in.

Ted
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-14 02:44:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ted Reber
<snip>
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
(Doh!) OR! You can go to SAM's Club (or another store that carries
them) and buy yourself a motorcycle/ATV lift ---- one I got cost $75 and
can
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
easily lift my ST1300 (once the bottom fairing sections are removed).
To
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
really spoil yourself, get a little shop stool to sit on while you work
(Torin
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Ted Reber
Big Red pneumatic in my case --- $19 at the same SAM's Club).
Ted from Pa.
you know that is something to look into - I would have to see how big one
is. any good sites? just to check one that you feel is good and as small
as
Post by Shadow Spirit
possible.
thank you
Tom
Don't have any sites to site, but mine comes from a company called
Larin.
Most of them are not too large size-wise, outside of the outriggers they
often
use for stability, but they are pretty heavy. They have to be sturdy enough
to lift 1,000 pounds more or less, plus their weight helps keep them
stable in addition to the outriggers. Mine is about 2 ft. by 1-1/2 ft. and
6 to
7 inches tall when collapsed and the outriggers folded in.
Ted
thanks for the info Ted - I will look into that if the other way is just too
much of a hassle
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 17:10:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Botts
--
To contact me by e-mail, insert a "t" between the first two letters of my
address.
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in
and
Post by Shadow Spirit
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser
and
Post by Steven Botts
I
Post by Shadow Spirit
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I don't know im thinking tomorrow go to the DMV and get my license. can
anyone guess where I might go Saturday?
Shadow.
I have a '94 Magna 750 and I'm very pleased with it. I just returned from a
6000 mile road trip on mine that took me through deserts, mountains,
go ahead rub it in :)

heat,
Post by Steven Botts
cold, heavy traffic, and many hours of sustained high-speed riding with no
trouble at all.
Lubing the drive chain on a bike like the Magna, which has no centerstand
can be a bitch. After many repetitions of the roll-and-squirt method, I
finally found an easier way.
First, find a fairly empty parking lot. Then take off your left sidecover so
you can see the chain. Then place a can of your favorite chain lube between
your thighs, start the bike, and drive slowly forward.
Going as slowly as you can, take the chain lube in your left hand, aim it at
the moving chain and give it a good long squirt.
It's easy and relatively clean. Just don't ride too long with your head down
watching the chain.
You will have to adjust the chain once in awhile, but probably not as often
as you think. I adjusted mine before leaving home and didn't have to do it
again for the entire trip.
Steve
I love you guys I really do ( in a manly kind of way of course) - I would be
lost without you.
lol I don't know if I will be ready for you method for a while - time will
tell and I will
definitely look into it.. that you so much
Tom
Matthew Lundberg
2003-10-10 18:50:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Steven Botts
--
To contact me by e-mail, insert a "t" between the first two letters of my
address.
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in
and
Post by Shadow Spirit
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and
[snip]
Post by Steven Botts
Lubing the drive chain on a bike like the Magna, which has no centerstand
can be a bitch. After many repetitions of the roll-and-squirt method, I
finally found an easier way.
First, find a fairly empty parking lot. Then take off your left sidecover so
you can see the chain. Then place a can of your favorite chain lube between
your thighs, start the bike, and drive slowly forward.
I would not recommend anyone putting their hands anywhere near the chain
while the engine is running, even if the bike is up on a stand. Doing this
while riding sounds just plain idiotic.

You can buy a floor jack for less than $100. You can make a lift out of
plumbing parts, probably for less than $30.
Steven Botts
2003-10-10 22:47:25 UTC
Permalink
--
To contact me by e-mail, insert a "t" between the first two letters of my
address.
Post by Matthew Lundberg
Post by Steven Botts
--
To contact me by e-mail, insert a "t" between the first two letters of my
address.
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in
and
Post by Shadow Spirit
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and
[snip]
Post by Steven Botts
Lubing the drive chain on a bike like the Magna, which has no centerstand
can be a bitch. After many repetitions of the roll-and-squirt method, I
finally found an easier way.
First, find a fairly empty parking lot. Then take off your left sidecover so
you can see the chain. Then place a can of your favorite chain lube between
your thighs, start the bike, and drive slowly forward.
I would not recommend anyone putting their hands anywhere near the chain
while the engine is running, even if the bike is up on a stand. Doing this
while riding sounds just plain idiotic.
When your hand is wrapped around a can which is several inches away from the
chain itself, while you' re watching and spraying lubricant, there's not
much danger. The only real risk (which I warned about) is keeping your head
down too long and hitting something.

But, if you're seriously worried about moving chains, it's almost as easy to
remove the left sidecover, straddle the motorcycle, and walk it backwards
(engine off) while you spray.
Post by Matthew Lundberg
You can buy a floor jack for less than $100. You can make a lift out of
plumbing parts, probably for less than $30.
Those things are just too heavy and take up too much space on a long trip.

Steve
Phyloe
2003-10-10 22:55:44 UTC
Permalink
"Matthew Lundberg" > wrote in message
You can make a lift out of plumbing parts, probably for less than $30.

Please continue with this thought.
Phyloe
Charles Soto
2003-10-10 23:31:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phyloe
"Matthew Lundberg" > wrote in message
You can make a lift out of plumbing parts, probably for less than $30.
Please continue with this thought.
Phyloe
Two words: Duct tape!

Charles
--
Charles Soto - Austin, TX *** 1999 GSF1200S, DoD No. "uno"

("Meepmeep" is "rr," as in "roadrunner.")
Matthew Lundberg
2003-10-11 20:52:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phyloe
"Matthew Lundberg" > wrote in message
You can make a lift out of plumbing parts, probably for less than $30.
Please continue with this thought.
Phyloe
A rectangular section of pipes, wide enough on which to rest your frame
rails, and tall enough to get the tire off the ground. A long lever at
one corner, perpendictular to the plane of the rectangle.

Put the rectangle under the bike, parallel to the ground so that the
lever is pointing straight up. Push the lever to the ground, so that
the long side of the rectangle which does not hold the lever remains
in contact with the ground, and the other side holds your frame.

You get one wheel off the ground at a time with this setup, but for
most work it's enough.
mtm
2003-10-10 04:41:52 UTC
Permalink
Tom ...
You had me worried for a while. I woulda bet money on the final choice
tho.
Honda ... Nighthawk, Spirit, or Magna.

The Magna is an excellent choice. It's kinda like the Nighthawk. It
doesn't "excel" at any one thing in particular, but does everything very
competently. That's it's only drawback. It's so typically Honda.
It's a very docile machine, but can haul some serious ass when called
upon.
Folks that own 'em, love 'em.

Just one thing. Any of these three bikes tires, should be run at 5%
Below the manf. suggested pressures. These bikes have been know to have
premature tire wear (center of tread) based on slight overinflation.
Other than that, all those three bikes are almost bulletproof.
BTW, The chain issue, is Not an issue.






mtm

seen on bumper:
Be kind to animals, hug a 1% er.

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 17:06:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
Tom ...
You had me worried for a while. I woulda bet money on the final choice
tho.
Honda ... Nighthawk, Spirit, or Magna.
The Magna is an excellent choice. It's kinda like the Nighthawk. It
doesn't "excel" at any one thing in particular, but does everything very
competently. That's it's only drawback. It's so typically Honda.
It's a very docile machine, but can haul some serious ass when called
upon.
Folks that own 'em, love 'em.
Just one thing. Any of these three bikes tires, should be run at 5%
Below the manf. suggested pressures. These bikes have been know to have
premature tire wear (center of tread) based on slight overinflation.
Other than that, all those three bikes are almost bulletproof.
BTW, The chain issue, is Not an issue.
mtm
Post by mtm
Be kind to animals, hug a 1% er.
'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
thank you.. I will look into that tire pressure thing.
and I think you helped insure me that I made a right choice.
I don't need a powerful cruiser or a powerful sport bike.
I think that for where I am and for my taste this will give
me the best of both worlds at slow speeds. I can sit
the way I am comfortable and have a good street bike.
thank you again. the bike is intended to help me make more money
if my plan works in a few years il get a powerful street rob for touring or
maybe even a goldwing.
Tom
Tom.
Phyloe
2003-10-10 19:49:50 UTC
Permalink
"Shadow Spirit" <> >
Post by Shadow Spirit
I don't need a powerful cruiser or a powerful sport bike.
I think that for where I am and for my taste this will give
me the best of both worlds at slow speeds.
Man! I do not know what you are thinking about but I need to tell you
sumpthin'. When this version of the Magna first came out in '94 in the
cruiser category the ONLY bike faster was and is the V-MAX! Then the
Valkery came out and in a quarter mile the money is an even bet depending on
who is riding which bike between the Magna and the Valk. Make no mistake
Spirit, the Magna is damn fast! 4 cylinders, 4 carbs, 4 pipes, 16 valves.
Wait until you hit 6K rpm in 1st gear, see how long it takes to get to 9K.
You better be ready to shift! Promise me you will post a follow up thread
about that experience! Have fun!
Phyloe
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 22:29:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Phyloe
"Shadow Spirit" <> >
Post by Shadow Spirit
I don't need a powerful cruiser or a powerful sport bike.
I think that for where I am and for my taste this will give
me the best of both worlds at slow speeds.
Man! I do not know what you are thinking about but I need to tell you
sumpthin'. When this version of the Magna first came out in '94 in the
cruiser category the ONLY bike faster was and is the V-MAX! Then the
Valkery came out and in a quarter mile the money is an even bet depending on
who is riding which bike between the Magna and the Valk. Make no mistake
Spirit, the Magna is damn fast! 4 cylinders, 4 carbs, 4 pipes, 16 valves.
Wait until you hit 6K rpm in 1st gear, see how long it takes to get to 9K.
You better be ready to shift! Promise me you will post a follow up thread
about that experience! Have fun!
Phyloe
Hello Phyloe:
please explain - is it good or bad? thank you. i dont really want
to keep shifting - a lot of times i will be driving will only be doing
about 20 - 30 mph - am i going to have to shift a lot?
Tom

Wait until you hit 6K rpm in 1st gear, see how long it takes to get to 9K.
Post by Phyloe
You better be ready to shift! Promise me you will post a follow up thread
about that experience! Have fun!
Phyloe
Phyloe
2003-10-10 22:53:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Phyloe
"Shadow Spirit" <> >
Post by Shadow Spirit
I don't need a powerful cruiser or a powerful sport bike.
I think that for where I am and for my taste this will give
me the best of both worlds at slow speeds.
Man! I do not know what you are thinking about but I need to tell you
sumpthin'. When this version of the Magna first came out in '94 in the
cruiser category the ONLY bike faster was and is the V-MAX! Then the
Valkery came out and in a quarter mile the money is an even bet
depending
Post by Shadow Spirit
on
Post by Phyloe
who is riding which bike between the Magna and the Valk. Make no mistake
Spirit, the Magna is damn fast! 4 cylinders, 4 carbs, 4 pipes, 16 valves.
Wait until you hit 6K rpm in 1st gear, see how long it takes to get to 9K.
You better be ready to shift! Promise me you will post a follow up thread
about that experience! Have fun!
Phyloe
please explain - is it good or bad? thank you. i dont really want
to keep shifting - a lot of times i will be driving will only be doing
about 20 - 30 mph - am i going to have to shift a lot?
Tom
Well you will not be shifting any more than other bikes riding at 30 mph.
The bike has a five speed but you will not need 4th or 5th in town. You will
be in 1st to 3rd all the time. It really depends on where in the rpm range
you are comfortable. In 2nd gear at 30 mph you will have about 3500 to 4000
rpm. This is just below the median for this bike but when you are doing it
the rpm's seem high for the speed. You will figure it out. I normally run
about 3000 to 3500 in third for a leisurely Putt in town though like HH I
quite often amd forced to blip the throttle in 2nd and do that "Illegal
display of speed" thingie. I try to control it but unless you are dead you
cannot deny the kick in the pants! I did the same thing with my GTO and GTX
and Sport Fury many years ago when the gas was good and I was imortal! But I
digress. You will figure it out. Save your money 'cause the stock seat sucks
and you will want an aftermarket soon. You might also want a small
windshield. (Xmas is coming) You can find lots of stuff for sale at the
Magna Riders Association site. For $20 you can join and get a membership
card, and a Tee-shirt.
Phyloe
Brennan
2003-10-10 21:11:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by mtm
Just one thing. Any of these three bikes tires, should be run at 5%
Below the manf. suggested pressures. These bikes have been know to have
premature tire wear (center of tread) based on slight overinflation.
thank you.. I will look into that tire pressure thing.
Please do. Here are some references:

http://www.gwrra.org/regional/ridered/news/May2002.pdf
"Our inspection of tires of various styles & manufacture at rallies
and our subsequent testing have confirmed that underinflation (and/or
excessive load) causes tread groove cracking and can result in more
serious damage within the tire body. Uneven wear may also accompany
underinflated use. Failure to heed these visual warnings can result in
tire failure or blowout."

http://www.coopertire.com/us/en/safety/tireSafetyInstructions.asp
"Correct tire pressure is very important. Driving on any tire that
does not have the correct inflation pressure is dangerous. Proper
inflation pressure for your tires may be found in the vehicle owner's
manual or the vehicle's tire information placard.

"Any underinflated tire builds up excessive heat that may result in
sudden tire destruction."

http://www.ride-on.com/news.htm
"The No. 1 reason for roadside repair - year after year - is tires. In
2001, 53% of road calls for trucks and tractors handled by a major
service provider were tires. For trailers, 48% were for tires. Most
likely, many failures happened because of underinflated tires. FNA's
Summer feels about half of the tire-related road calls his vendors
handle could be eliminated by better tire maintenance, especially
proper tire inflation."

= = =

Are you beginning to see a pattern here? Moto pisses and moans about
how he was unfairly flamed for recommending underinflating tires. The
fact appears to be that underinflating is missing proper inflation in
the more dangerous direction. Recall that underinflated tires was a
big factor in the recent Ford Explorer - Firestone tire debacle.

Please look into it. Note that dozens of references on why
underinflating is bad can be found, and the only reference Moto has to
the contrary is "the guy at the Goodyear store." Go see the guy at
your local Goodyear dealer and see what he has to say. By all means
accept and evaluate all opinions given, but please try to err on the
side of caution. Your life is at stake; don't trust it to some
airhead on usenet.

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
mtm
2003-10-12 17:51:46 UTC
Permalink
Brennan ...
You still don't get it, do ya?

Why is it then, that many Magna and Nighthawk owners (myself included)
report that their tires are wearing out the middle section of the tire,
but leaving the outer sections in good shape? Underinflation? No you
hardhead, it's Overinflation.

Why? Couldn't be that Honda made an error, could it?
OR, Maybe 'cause folks tend to overload their bikes, and Honda is tryin'
to cover ass, regardless of the (tire) cost to the consumer? That's a
consideration too, or you don't believe that either?

All I/we know is this. With mostly single up ridin', with tires at 33
psi, the tires wear out too quickly, but ONLY in the inner (center)
couple inches of the tread. Classic overinflation.
Drop 'em down a couple lbs, and you can SEE what happens by doing a wet
test (as I described earlier) and SEE how the footprint improves, NOT
degrades.

When you get EVEN wear from/on a tire, better traction from/on a tire,
by using common sense, as opposed to the manuals erroneous
recommendations, you have facts that folks like you can argue about till
hell freezes over, but it ain't gonna change what experience, and our
tires tell us.

BTW, the 'wet' test I mentioned has been used for years when proper tire
temprature device is not available.
Wanna talk about tire temps? Wanna bet a slightly overinflated tire is
'hotter' center section, than on the outers of the tread?

You need some 'hands on' experiance, Brennan. The 'man' says "Correct
tire presssure is very important."
Nobody agrues that. Just what that correct pressure is, is what's in
question here.






mtm

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-12 18:21:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
Brennan ...
You still don't get it, do ya?
Why is it then, that many Magna and Nighthawk owners (myself included)
report that their tires are wearing out the middle section of the tire,
but leaving the outer sections in good shape? Underinflation? No you
hardhead, it's Overinflation.
Why? Couldn't be that Honda made an error, could it?
OR, Maybe 'cause folks tend to overload their bikes, and Honda is tryin'
to cover ass, regardless of the (tire) cost to the consumer? That's a
consideration too, or you don't believe that either?
All I/we know is this. With mostly single up ridin', with tires at 33
psi, the tires wear out too quickly, but ONLY in the inner (center)
couple inches of the tread. Classic overinflation.
Drop 'em down a couple lbs, and you can SEE what happens by doing a wet
test (as I described earlier) and SEE how the footprint improves, NOT
degrades.
When you get EVEN wear from/on a tire, better traction from/on a tire,
by using common sense, as opposed to the manuals erroneous
recommendations, you have facts that folks like you can argue about till
hell freezes over, but it ain't gonna change what experience, and our
tires tell us.
BTW, the 'wet' test I mentioned has been used for years when proper tire
temprature device is not available.
Wanna talk about tire temps? Wanna bet a slightly overinflated tire is
'hotter' center section, than on the outers of the tread?
You need some 'hands on' experiance, Brennan. The 'man' says "Correct
tire presssure is very important."
Nobody agrues that. Just what that correct pressure is, is what's in
question here.
mtm
'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
could it be that tire pressure should also be adjusted to the wieght of the
driver/passenger?
mtm
2003-10-12 19:25:02 UTC
Permalink
Tom ...
I'm about 170 lbs.
I_think_ 'they' figger the average at about 160 or so. A few pounds on
the rider, one way ot the other, ain't gonna matter that much..
Now, in a racing situation, which is a whole other ball game, then very
small amounts of pressure (plus a different breed of tires) has a
bearing on what's gonna be determined as a 'proper' inflation. Then,
even the riders weight is a big factor.
That's what has some of the people all messed up. We're talking just two
(well, maybe three) models of bikes that have exibited the same problem.
That being wearing the inner (middle) part of the tread out before the
outer, or NOT getting an even wear pattern. This on bikes being ridden
by just 'regular' riders, on well maintained bikes. Not some
knee-scraper, canyon carving on a sport bike.
^
That presents a whole new set of 'rules' when it comes to tire pressure,
and even make and/or model of tire to handle that kinda ridin'
condition(s).

I've got 6k on a set of OEM tires that look like they've got 1500 mi on
'em.
What's there to say?






mtm

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
keith s.
2003-10-12 20:02:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
could it be that tire pressure should also be adjusted to the wieght of the
driver/passenger?
Or maybe the stupid fucks need to do more than ride from bar to bar chasing the
harley owners. Take a few more corners the center wont appear to wear so
fast...stupid people should be neutered.


Nefarious Necrologist 42nd class
Some people ride, some just like to show off their butt
jewelry once in a while.
Dum vivimus, vivamus
mtm
2003-10-13 15:22:57 UTC
Permalink
Keith ...
Let's rephrase that, huh? People who don't agree with You should be
neutered. That'd be about half the male population.

emore & odinn ......
If you guys got your heads out your ass, or just Simply read the
previous posts, you'd see the bike(s) we/I were talking about (not to
disclude others with the same problem) is the Nighthawk and the Magna.

The Nighthawks suggested pressure F&R are/is 33 lbs. For someone who
does/has a diverse type of riding conditions, that _may_be okay.
They_may_end up with a Reasonably acceptable wear pattern and/or mileage
on their tires.

For those (the majority) who don't get a chance to use their bikes in a
more diverse manner, the tread wear pattern starts to show premature
signs of wear (center section of tread) suggesting overinflation. For
them (myself included) 33 lbs IS overinflation, and a 5-10% drop in
pressure will give them a better 'footprint', and much better, and more
even tread wear pattrern, plus longer tire life.

Now, if you wanna argue that, be my guest. What I've said holds.

We've already had more than just two (that's if you jokers have been
payin' attention) folks who Own those Hondas and post here complain
about premature, and 'unusal' tire wear. For those folks, my suggestion
is the answer. It worked for others I know, and it worked for me.

Wanna argue that? Again, be my guest.






mtm

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
SRQEagan
2003-10-13 16:05:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
For those (the majority) who don't get a chance to use their bikes in a
more diverse manner, the tread wear pattern starts to show premature
signs of wear (center section of tread) suggesting overinflation. For
them (myself included) 33 lbs IS overinflation, and a 5-10% drop in
pressure will give them a better 'footprint', and much better, and more
even tread wear pattrern, plus longer tire life.
Now, if you wanna argue that, be my guest. What I've said holds.
Re-read Mags reply to you, jackass.

You are an idiot, and I pity anyone that listens to your "suggestion".
Lowering your tire pressure below that recommended can seriously effect the
handling of the bike - especially considering varying rider weight, load
weight, etc.

It's "advice" like this that makes me, and others here, doubt that you ride at
all. The only "joker" here is you.

Iggy
'01 Dyna Super Glide
'96 Mustang GT Convertible
Keep your powder dry and don't let your meat-loaf. :o)
Brennan
2003-10-14 14:16:59 UTC
Permalink
<mtm>
Post by mtm
For those (the majority) who don't get a chance to use their bikes in a
more diverse manner, the tread wear pattern starts to show premature
signs of wear (center section of tread) suggesting overinflation. For
them (myself included) 33 lbs IS overinflation, and a 5-10% drop in
pressure will give them a better 'footprint', and much better, and more
even tread wear pattrern, plus longer tire life.
Now, if you wanna argue that, be my guest. What I've said holds.
I'm not going to argue with you, you're an imbecile on whom logic is
wasted. If you stick to harmless nonsense I'll continue to be happy
to ignore you. If you post faulty information that could end up
getting someone killed, I'll post factual information to contradict.
It's that simple.

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
Margaret M.
2003-10-13 16:16:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
The Nighthawks suggested pressure F&R are/is 33 lbs. For someone who
does/has a diverse type of riding conditions, that _may_be okay.
They_may_end up with a Reasonably acceptable wear pattern and/or mileage
on their tires.
Moto, not to harangue the point, but I'm not sure I understand what
you're saying. This "diverse type of riding conditions" you are
speaking of...would you be speaking of riding twisties? That's what I
gather from your post. That's not a diverse riding condition, it is one
of the intended uses of a motorcycle.
Post by mtm
For those (the majority) who don't get a chance to use their bikes in a
more diverse manner, the tread wear pattern starts to show premature
signs of wear (center section of tread) suggesting overinflation. For
I'm notorious for being lazy about checking my tires and running them
underinflated, and GUESS WHAT? I STILL wore the center out of my tires
riding freeway! That's not premature wear, it is normal for mostly
highway use. I have to say, I can't agree with what you are saying. It
won't matter if the bike is a Magna, Nighthawk, Vulcan, or HD, if you
ride mostly straight highway, you WILL wear out the center of the tread
before the edges wear. I have proven it on my '01 Vulcan 800 Classic in
19,956 miles of riding, and am on my way to proving it with the 4300
miles I've put on my '03 Vulcan. If I had my 'druthers, I'd be riding
twisties, even on my tractor, but unfortunately, there aren't a lot of
twisties on my way to Houston, Galveston, etc... where I put on most of
my miles. Still...I ride.
Mag
Robert Bolton
2003-10-13 22:01:09 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
Keith ...
Let's rephrase that, huh? People who don't agree with You should be
neutered. That'd be about half the male population.
emore & odinn ......
If you guys got your heads out your ass, or just Simply read the
previous posts, you'd see the bike(s) we/I were talking about (not to
disclude others with the same problem) is the Nighthawk and the Magna.
The Nighthawks suggested pressure F&R are/is 33 lbs. For someone who
does/has a diverse type of riding conditions, that _may_be okay.
They_may_end up with a Reasonably acceptable wear pattern and/or mileage
on their tires.
Let me begin by saying my post is not an arguement, but a discussion.

While the recommended front tire pressure is 33lbs, the recommended pressure for the
rear tire is 33 psi for up to a 200 lb load and 41 psi for the max load of 355 per my
1992 Nighthawk manual. This makes sense in that the front tire won't experience much
of a load change between min and max while the rear will. I have33 front and rear in
mine, but am not happy with the handling since I put new tires on it.

I've had different style autos and driven them differently over the years, and have
adjusted the air pressure to suit myself. I needed higher pressures in the front for
cornering in the hot rod, lower pressures for the back end of an unloaded pickup for
traction and to reduce center tread wear, and adjusted the mini-van for comfort.

I'm sure one can do the same for bikes.
Post by mtm
For those (the majority) who don't get a chance to use their bikes in a
more diverse manner, the tread wear pattern starts to show premature
signs of wear (center section of tread) suggesting overinflation. For
them (myself included) 33 lbs IS overinflation, and a 5-10% drop in
pressure will give them a better 'footprint', and much better, and more
even tread wear pattrern, plus longer tire life.
This is a little redundant, but it's my perspective.
I have read that over-inflation can make a bike a little too responsive to road and
rider imperfections, but I think underinflation can create handling problems as well.
True? Another pressure consideration might be suspension. The Nighthawk's suspension
has been described as weak and I have bottomed the forks out hitting a frost heave in
the road. I was only doing 50 mph but the dip ended in a pretty steep rise back to
normal elevation. The tires have to take up the slack when you bottom out, so it may
be that the Nighthawk needs that extra psi.
Post by mtm
Now, if you wanna argue that, be my guest. What I've said holds.
We've already had more than just two (that's if you jokers have been
payin' attention) folks who Own those Hondas and post here complain
about premature, and 'unusal' tire wear. For those folks, my suggestion
is the answer. It worked for others I know, and it worked for me.
Wanna argue that? Again, be my guest.
I wouldn't worry about a 5% pressure drop (1.65 psi is not much), but I'm not sure I'd
go 10%. Given the pressure differences displayed between different gauges, one could
end up being 15% low with the wrong gauge.

All things in moderation I suppose. I wouldn't say that tread wear defines
over-inflation for arced treads, but I believe there's room to vary pressure a little
to suit one's environment. Someone who works for Honda used some method to pick a
number, but I'm sure there are rider positions, road conditions, and rider styles that
would allow a little personal tweaking. Maybe they recommend pressures strictly by
load? I want maximum traction and handling without sacrificing safety to complement
my skill level (that means I want as much help as I can get), and would sacrifice
tread wear to get the others.

If the tread wear is unusual, what do you supposed is the cause? The tire
manufacturer might be the best place to find out what pressure supports a particular
load. Perhaps the Nighthawk's characteristics require an inflation pressure that
increases what would otherwise be the normal amount of center tread wear? Lowering
the pressure might or might not hurt the tire and the bike's performance, but Honda
has told you what they think.

Is 11k miles too short a tire life for the Dunlops? Do they have exceptionally soft
rubber? FWIW, my skinnier front tire wears much more evenly than my fatter rear.

Robert
mtm
2003-10-13 23:30:30 UTC
Permalink
Robert ... not quotin' here.....

Well, how 'bout that?
I guess you were paying attention, and some of these other folks are
still looking for an argument.
Jeezus, I wasn't tellin' Tom, or anyone else to Flatten their damn
tires, I simply said that the Honda folks (maybe others too) have got
that tire pressure a hair high on a couple of their bikes for someone
with moderate riding habits. End of story.

This isn't the only bike I've played with pressure on. It's certainly
not my first bike.
It depends on the bike, tires, my weight,
what kinda ridin' I'm doing at that time, many factors.

My primary concern is my safety. These OEM tires (which I got a great
deal on) are not The absolute best. There are tires that are stickier
(softer compound) that offer a little better traction and maybe a bit
better braking, but these work pretty well for me. I wanna make the SOBs
last as long as possible. There's nothing I dread more than tire
changin'. I hate it, and I'll go to almost any length to avoid it.
That's why I do what I do, and I feel I'm safer for it. I know what to
expect from my
tire(s) and know what to do to squeeze every safe mile I can out of 'em.
No crime in that, is there?






mtm

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-14 01:32:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bolton
Post by mtm
Keith ...
Let's rephrase that, huh? People who don't agree with You should be
neutered. That'd be about half the male population.
emore & odinn ......
If you guys got your heads out your ass, or just Simply read the
previous posts, you'd see the bike(s) we/I were talking about (not to
disclude others with the same problem) is the Nighthawk and the Magna.
The Nighthawks suggested pressure F&R are/is 33 lbs. For someone who
does/has a diverse type of riding conditions, that _may_be okay.
They_may_end up with a Reasonably acceptable wear pattern and/or mileage
on their tires.
Let me begin by saying my post is not an arguement, but a discussion.
While the recommended front tire pressure is 33lbs, the recommended pressure for the
rear tire is 33 psi for up to a 200 lb load and 41 psi for the max load of 355 per my
1992 Nighthawk manual.
i knew there had to be something like that. lol but wasnt really sure - no
doubt one of the first things
i do when i get my bike - is check that out it has to affect the handleing.


This makes sense in that the front tire won't experience much
Post by Robert Bolton
of a load change between min and max while the rear will. I have33 front and rear in
mine, but am not happy with the handling since I put new tires on it.
right now im thinking the air pressure suggested by the manufacture is
starting point
to be adjusted accordingly to the load being carried.? as i also think
sudden changes in temperature
can also affect tir air pressure.
Post by Robert Bolton
I've had different style autos and driven them differently over the years, and have
adjusted the air pressure to suit myself. I needed higher pressures in the front for
cornering in the hot rod, lower pressures for the back end of an unloaded pickup for
traction and to reduce center tread wear, and adjusted the mini-van for comfort.
I'm sure one can do the same for bikes.
just more important to do it right on a motorcycle. and maybe the suggested
is safer for most who just might do this wrong. or in a heavy persons case
it may
and i think it is very important to change a bike that has been set up for a
much lighter person.
Post by Robert Bolton
Post by mtm
For those (the majority) who don't get a chance to use their bikes in a
more diverse manner, the tread wear pattern starts to show premature
signs of wear (center section of tread) suggesting overinflation. For
them (myself included) 33 lbs IS overinflation, and a 5-10% drop in
pressure will give them a better 'footprint', and much better, and more
even tread wear pattrern, plus longer tire life.
a person is suposed to drive with in his or hers and the bikes abililty
if a person cusimizes a bike to fit his or her needs makes a bike more
unstable (extreme choppers) lol well they look more unstable then others.
it is up to that person to drive the bike accordingly. so if a person tells
me they drop pressure 10%
for what ever reasons he must adjust his riding as well. maybe a very light
person with the suggested air pressure
just might see premature ejac i mean wear. just as an extremely heavey
person might have to increase air pressure.
but to overinflate or underinflate to the carrieing wieght i would think
that adjustments would have to be made to the driving.
to lower the seat hight by adjusting that thing in the back just may be very
risky but lets say the person was only going to be driving
10mph is it still so risky?
i wouldnt want underinflated tires on twisties doing 120 lol hell idont
think i want over inflated tires on that one.
i dont think i want to be on a bike doing 120 on twisties so forget this
example.
from an outside point of view i can see how both sides feel they are right.
i my self am not so worried about pre mature wear so i will just adjust it
to my wieght if it needs it.
Tom
Post by Robert Bolton
This is a little redundant, but it's my perspective.
I have read that over-inflation can make a bike a little too responsive to road and
rider imperfections, but I think underinflation can create handling problems as well.
True? Another pressure consideration might be suspension. The Nighthawk's suspension
has been described as weak and I have bottomed the forks out hitting a frost heave in
the road. I was only doing 50 mph but the dip ended in a pretty steep rise back to
normal elevation. The tires have to take up the slack when you bottom out, so it may
be that the Nighthawk needs that extra psi.
Post by mtm
Now, if you wanna argue that, be my guest. What I've said holds.
We've already had more than just two (that's if you jokers have been
payin' attention) folks who Own those Hondas and post here complain
about premature, and 'unusal' tire wear. For those folks, my suggestion
is the answer. It worked for others I know, and it worked for me.
Wanna argue that? Again, be my guest.
I wouldn't worry about a 5% pressure drop (1.65 psi is not much), but I'm not sure I'd
go 10%. Given the pressure differences displayed between different gauges, one could
end up being 15% low with the wrong gauge.
All things in moderation I suppose. I wouldn't say that tread wear defines
over-inflation for arced treads, but I believe there's room to vary pressure a little
to suit one's environment. Someone who works for Honda used some method to pick a
number, but I'm sure there are rider positions, road conditions, and rider styles that
would allow a little personal tweaking. Maybe they recommend pressures strictly by
load? I want maximum traction and handling without sacrificing safety to complement
my skill level (that means I want as much help as I can get), and would sacrifice
tread wear to get the others.
If the tread wear is unusual, what do you supposed is the cause? The tire
manufacturer might be the best place to find out what pressure supports a particular
load. Perhaps the Nighthawk's characteristics require an inflation pressure that
increases what would otherwise be the normal amount of center tread wear?
Lowering
Post by Robert Bolton
the pressure might or might not hurt the tire and the bike's performance, but Honda
has told you what they think.
Is 11k miles too short a tire life for the Dunlops? Do they have exceptionally soft
rubber? FWIW, my skinnier front tire wears much more evenly than my fatter rear.
Robert
Brennan
2003-10-14 14:13:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bolton
Is 11k miles too short a tire life for the Dunlops? Do they have exceptionally soft
rubber? FWIW, my skinnier front tire wears much more evenly than my fatter rear.
11K on a touring rear is a little better than average, I'd say. I get
about 9K per rear, and my front has worn thin at 27K. Not a bad
ratio, 3 rear per 1 front. I didn't catch what bike you own, I'm
talking about my 750 pound touring bike, running Dunlop. I'm
switching to ME880s on the next change.

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
Margaret M.
2003-10-14 20:00:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brennan
Post by Robert Bolton
Is 11k miles too short a tire life for the Dunlops? Do they have exceptionally soft
rubber? FWIW, my skinnier front tire wears much more evenly than my fatter rear.
11K on a touring rear is a little better than average, I'd say. I get
about 9K per rear, and my front has worn thin at 27K. Not a bad
ratio, 3 rear per 1 front. I didn't catch what bike you own, I'm
talking about my 750 pound touring bike, running Dunlop. I'm
switching to ME880s on the next change.
Same here. I got 12,200 on my Rockstone...er...Bridgestone rear that
came with the '01 Vulcan, but it really should have been changed around
10,500 or 11,000. Still had the original front when I had my Suburban
encounter. My '03 has 4300 miles on it so far, and I'm replacing it
with a Dunlop when it's time. That's on a 517 lb dry-600 lb wet and
loaded bike carrying my 150 lb butt around. If you're riding a
sportbike, doing more twisties, you can look for between 3,000 - 6,000
miles per rear from what I've read here. I can't advise you on
sportbikes tires, but one of the knowledgeable many here will pipe in
shortly. (unless they've killed the thread)
Mag
Robert Bolton
2003-10-15 04:25:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brennan
Post by Robert Bolton
Is 11k miles too short a tire life for the Dunlops? Do they have exceptionally soft
rubber? FWIW, my skinnier front tire wears much more evenly than my fatter rear.
11K on a touring rear is a little better than average, I'd say. I get
about 9K per rear, and my front has worn thin at 27K. Not a bad
ratio, 3 rear per 1 front. I didn't catch what bike you own, I'm
talking about my 750 pound touring bike, running Dunlop. I'm
switching to ME880s on the next change.
I wish I had a tour bike for long rides but I've got a 463 lb Nighthawk.

Robert
keith s.
2003-10-15 14:59:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bolton
I wish I had a tour bike for long rides but I've got a 463 lb Nighthawk.
Robert
What makes you think your nighthawk isn't capable of touring?


Nefarious Necrologist 42nd class
Some people ride, some just like to show off their butt
jewelry once in a while.
Dum vivimus, vivamus
Charles Soto
2003-10-15 15:40:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by keith s.
Post by Robert Bolton
I wish I had a tour bike for long rides but I've got a 463 lb Nighthawk.
Robert
What makes you think your nighthawk isn't capable of touring?
The last time it did, the roadies got loaded and trashed the tour bus...

Charles
--
Charles Soto - Austin, TX *** 1999 GSF1200S, DoD No. "uno"

("Meepmeep" is "rr," as in "roadrunner.")
keith s.
2003-10-15 18:26:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Charles Soto
Post by keith s.
What makes you think your nighthawk isn't capable of touring?
The last time it did, the roadies got loaded and trashed the tour bus...
Charles
So? it was just rental anyway...didn't the accountants and lawyers take care of
it? oops, I shouldn't have mentioned that.

p.s. imagine that rain in washington.
p.p.s. yeah I forgot my WW gear this AM.

Nefarious Necrologist 42nd class
Some people ride, some just like to show off their butt
jewelry once in a while.
Dum vivimus, vivamus
Robert Bolton
2003-10-16 05:43:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by keith s.
Post by Robert Bolton
I wish I had a tour bike for long rides but I've got a 463 lb Nighthawk.
Robert
What makes you think your nighthawk isn't capable of touring?
I'm not sure what you mean by capable. The bike itself can handle highway speeds and
two-up just fine, but I feel a larger bike would permit the better seating,
faring/windshield, and cargo capacity. I'd like to have a good rear seat that's
raised for the passenger, a comfortable front seat, a good fairing/windshield, good
bags, and a shaft thrown in for good measure.

The only thing that really stops me from touring with mine is the fact that my butt
truly starts hurting after an hour. I visit my family each summer and often think
about riding up there to visit, but I'm afraid riding for seven hours one way would be
rough. I suppose it would help if I stopped frequently along the way.

I bought my Nighthawk because it's light, has a standard rider position, and has a
decent amount of power. It's geared high enough for the highway and has plenty of
power for the both of us, but an old 4 cylinder Goldwing or Harley would be better for
an all day ride.

Robert
keith s.
2003-10-16 06:04:14 UTC
Permalink
snip
Post by Robert Bolton
I bought my Nighthawk because it's light, has a standard rider position, and has a
decent amount of power. It's geared high enough for the highway and has plenty of
power for the both of us, but an old 4 cylinder Goldwing or Harley would be better for
an all day ride.
Robert
Okay, that works for me. Remind my feeble memory...this is the 750? If you want
a wing for a reasonable price there are many GL1200/1100/1000 out there for a
reasonable price with low miles(under 40,000mi)


Nefarious Necrologist 42nd class
Some people ride, some just like to show off their butt
jewelry once in a while.
Dum vivimus, vivamus
wrestleantares
2003-10-16 12:11:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by keith s.
snip
Post by Robert Bolton
I bought my Nighthawk because it's light, has a standard rider position, and has a
decent amount of power. It's geared high enough for the highway and has plenty of
power for the both of us, but an old 4 cylinder Goldwing or Harley would be better for
an all day ride.
Robert
Okay, that works for me. Remind my feeble memory...this is the 750? If you want
a wing for a reasonable price there are many GL1200/1100/1000 out there for a
reasonable price with low miles(under 40,000mi)
I love my CB750C, it has made a great touring bike for many years.
Though it is now in the process of being replaced.
Post by keith s.
Nefarious Necrologist 42nd class
Some people ride, some just like to show off their butt
jewelry once in a while.
Dum vivimus, vivamus
Robert Bolton
2003-10-17 06:27:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by wrestleantares
Post by keith s.
snip
Post by Robert Bolton
I bought my Nighthawk because it's light, has a standard rider position, and has a
decent amount of power. It's geared high enough for the highway and has plenty of
power for the both of us, but an old 4 cylinder Goldwing or Harley would be better for
an all day ride.
Robert
Okay, that works for me. Remind my feeble memory...this is the 750? If you want
a wing for a reasonable price there are many GL1200/1100/1000 out there for a
reasonable price with low miles(under 40,000mi)
I love my CB750C, it has made a great touring bike for many years.
Though it is now in the process of being replaced.
They're good bikes I think. What does the seat look like on your the 750C?

Robert
wrestleantares
2003-10-21 18:32:15 UTC
Permalink
On Thu, 16 Oct 2003 22:27:56 -0800, "Robert Bolton"
Post by Robert Bolton
Post by wrestleantares
Post by keith s.
snip
Post by Robert Bolton
I bought my Nighthawk because it's light, has a standard rider position, and has a
decent amount of power. It's geared high enough for the highway and has plenty of
power for the both of us, but an old 4 cylinder Goldwing or Harley would be
better for
an all day ride.
Robert
Okay, that works for me. Remind my feeble memory...this is the 750? If you want
a wing for a reasonable price there are many GL1200/1100/1000 out there for a
reasonable price with low miles(under 40,000mi)
I love my CB750C, it has made a great touring bike for many years.
Though it is now in the process of being replaced.
They're good bikes I think. What does the seat look like on your the 750C?
Robert
Double quilted saddles

Robert Bolton
2003-10-17 06:09:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by keith s.
snip
Post by Robert Bolton
I bought my Nighthawk because it's light, has a standard rider position, and has a
decent amount of power. It's geared high enough for the highway and has plenty of
power for the both of us, but an old 4 cylinder Goldwing or Harley would be better for
an all day ride.
Robert
Okay, that works for me. Remind my feeble memory...this is the 750? If you want
a wing for a reasonable price there are many GL1200/1100/1000 out there for a
reasonable price with low miles(under 40,000mi)
Yes, 750. I'm no doubt going to upgrade one of these days, but I'll still have to
balance the ride to work function with the pleasure ride. With such a short riding
season, I ride to work as much as possible.

There was a Pacific Coast I was eying before I bought the Nighthawk, but reviews said
it was too gutless and the looks were just a little too off for me.

Robert
keith s.
2003-10-17 07:27:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Robert Bolton
Yes, 750. I'm no doubt going to upgrade one of these days, but I'll still have to
balance the ride to work function with the pleasure ride. With such a short riding
season, I ride to work as much as possible.
Your more modern 750 is just fine for commuting AND touring. It'll do fine,
just have to accesorize appropriatly. Trust me...I use a GL1000 for everything!
You are getting more power than I do with less weight.
Post by Robert Bolton
There was a Pacific Coast I was eying before I bought the Nighthawk, but reviews said
it was too gutless and the looks were just a little too off for me.
Robert
Don't believe everything you read. The PC is one of the best commuters ever
according to the people I've talked to that acctually ride them. Not to shabby
as a tourer either.


Nefarious Necrologist 42nd class
Some people ride, some just like to show off their butt
jewelry once in a while.
Dum vivimus, vivamus
Robert Bolton
2003-10-18 07:42:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by keith s.
Post by Robert Bolton
Yes, 750. I'm no doubt going to upgrade one of these days, but I'll still have to
balance the ride to work function with the pleasure ride. With such a short riding
season, I ride to work as much as possible.
Your more modern 750 is just fine for commuting AND touring. It'll do fine,
just have to accesorize appropriatly. Trust me...I use a GL1000 for everything!
You are getting more power than I do with less weight.
It's been a fun bike for me, there's no doubt about that. Maybe I'll look for seat
options. My wife's 5ft while I'm 6ft 1, so a higher rear seat would be good for her.
I need to tie her to me too as she keeps falling asleep back there. I can tell when
she wakes up as she nearly breaks my ribs slapping my sides.
Post by keith s.
Post by Robert Bolton
There was a Pacific Coast I was eying before I bought the Nighthawk, but reviews said
it was too gutless and the looks were just a little too off for me.
Robert
Don't believe everything you read. The PC is one of the best commuters ever
according to the people I've talked to that acctually ride them. Not to shabby
as a tourer either.
A PC is a good combination of tour/city bike. That trunk looks like the back end of a
duck to me though. The one I looked at was a white 1989 with 8k on it for $3,000 as I
recall. It had a lot of ground clearance too. Better looks and more power is what it
needed maybe.

Robert
Duncan Cooper
2003-10-17 10:21:21 UTC
Permalink
Before you run out and replace a perfectly good, near bulletproof
bike, try an aftermarket seat. I just went thru this: replaced a
stock (read:sadistic) seat with a used Corbin for $150. Makes all the
difference in the world. Lots of superb aftermarket seats out there.
Try a Google search. Russel, Corbin, et al. It's likely there's a
huge market in slightly used CB750 parts out there, so you can
probably take this option for minimal risk (price). Believe me, it
transformed my VX800.

Coop
Robert Bolton
2003-10-18 08:04:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duncan Cooper
Before you run out and replace a perfectly good, near bulletproof
bike, try an aftermarket seat. I just went thru this: replaced a
stock (read:sadistic) seat with a used Corbin for $150. Makes all the
difference in the world. Lots of superb aftermarket seats out there.
Try a Google search. Russel, Corbin, et al. It's likely there's a
huge market in slightly used CB750 parts out there, so you can
probably take this option for minimal risk (price). Believe me, it
transformed my VX800.
I haven't looked around much, but I hear there's not much for Nighthawks because
they're not that popular. Thanks for the advice though. I might look around and see
what I can find out.

Robert
Brennan
2003-10-20 14:46:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Duncan Cooper
Before you run out and replace a perfectly good, near bulletproof
bike, try an aftermarket seat.
Yeah, now that oughta be in the FAQ.

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
cspan
2003-10-17 11:03:56 UTC
Permalink
I've got a tour bike for long rides - a 287 lb Nighthawk. Works fine for
me. Sore butts are the nature of long-distance bike touring, though
aftermarket seats may buy you an extra hour or two a day before you do
get sore. I'm happy enough with the stock seat; I'm skeptical that an
aftermarket one would be that much better anyway. I'd rather just get a
sheepskin cover or something if it would help.

With your specs, sounds like you either want a Gold Wing or a car. Sell
your Nighthawk and get a mid-80s luxo-barge with 25-30k for $4000.
Post by Robert Bolton
Post by keith s.
Post by Robert Bolton
I wish I had a tour bike for long rides but I've got a 463 lb Nighthawk.
Robert
What makes you think your nighthawk isn't capable of touring?
I'm not sure what you mean by capable. The bike itself can handle highway speeds and
two-up just fine, but I feel a larger bike would permit the better seating,
faring/windshield, and cargo capacity. I'd like to have a good rear seat that's
raised for the passenger, a comfortable front seat, a good fairing/windshield, good
bags, and a shaft thrown in for good measure.
The only thing that really stops me from touring with mine is the fact that my butt
truly starts hurting after an hour. I visit my family each summer and often think
about riding up there to visit, but I'm afraid riding for seven hours one way would be
rough. I suppose it would help if I stopped frequently along the way.
I bought my Nighthawk because it's light, has a standard rider position, and has a
decent amount of power. It's geared high enough for the highway and has plenty of
power for the both of us, but an old 4 cylinder Goldwing or Harley would be better for
an all day ride.
Robert
Margaret M.
2003-10-12 20:14:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
Brennan ...
You still don't get it, do ya?
Why is it then, that many Magna and Nighthawk owners (myself included)
report that their tires are wearing out the middle section of the tire,
but leaving the outer sections in good shape? Underinflation? No you
hardhead, it's Overinflation.
Moto, I think you have to understand, though, that the type of driving
also has a lot to do with tire wear. I run my front slightly less than
it's supposed to be because my bike handles better. My front end
doesn't "bounce" at high speeds. No...not "that" front end. :-) Anyone
who rides *mainly* highway, is going to have their tires wear in the
center faster than the sides. The canyon carvers are going to wear the
sides more. I ride way more highway than twisties, since I use it to
commute everywhere, and yeah, it's a tractor, but it'll still lean a
bit. The "wear in the middle" stuff is meant mainly for cars and
trucks, but *they* don't need to drive on the edges of their tires when
they corner. Every bike setup is going to be different, but I think I'd
be more concerned about smooth cornering than replacing squared off
tires. I got 12,200 miles on my rear on my '01 Vulcan, but it was so
squared off it got squirrelly on curves. Still, those of us on
cruisers, though we *love* our bikes, don't have to worry as much about
our rubber, as those canyon carving sportbikes. Yeah, it's important,
but we're not doing the extremes that the Bob Nixons, Larry Lovisone,
etc. are. Are you going to take responsibility for advising someone on
their tire pressure? The handling of the bike is much more important
than the expense of replacing rubber.
Mag
emore
2003-10-12 21:13:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Margaret M.
Post by mtm
Brennan ...
You still don't get it, do ya?
Why is it then, that many Magna and Nighthawk owners (myself included)
report that their tires are wearing out the middle section of the
tire,
Post by mtm
but leaving the outer sections in good shape? Underinflation? No you
hardhead, it's Overinflation.
Moto, I think you have to understand, though, that the type of driving
also has a lot to do with tire wear. I run my front slightly less than
it's supposed to be because my bike handles better. My front end
doesn't "bounce" at high speeds. No...not "that" front end. :-) Anyone
who rides *mainly* highway, is going to have their tires wear in the
center faster than the sides. The canyon carvers are going to wear the
sides more. I ride way more highway than twisties, since I use it to
commute everywhere, and yeah, it's a tractor, but it'll still lean a
bit. The "wear in the middle" stuff is meant mainly for cars and
trucks, but *they* don't need to drive on the edges of their tires when
they corner. Every bike setup is going to be different, but I think I'd
be more concerned about smooth cornering than replacing squared off
tires. I got 12,200 miles on my rear on my '01 Vulcan, but it was so
squared off it got squirrelly on curves. Still, those of us on
cruisers, though we *love* our bikes, don't have to worry as much about
our rubber, as those canyon carving sportbikes. Yeah, it's important,
but we're not doing the extremes that the Bob Nixons, Larry Lovisone,
etc. are. Are you going to take responsibility for advising someone on
their tire pressure? The handling of the bike is much more important
than the expense of replacing rubber.
Mag
Thank you for saying what I and probably others are just too damn tired
to try to get across yet again, to yet another one that knows better
than Honda, et al. You really do more than your share. Thanks.

Emore
Odinn
2003-10-12 22:16:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by emore
Post by Margaret M.
Post by mtm
Brennan ...
You still don't get it, do ya?
Why is it then, that many Magna and Nighthawk owners (myself included)
report that their tires are wearing out the middle section of the
tire,
Post by mtm
but leaving the outer sections in good shape? Underinflation? No you
hardhead, it's Overinflation.
Moto, I think you have to understand, though, that the type of driving
also has a lot to do with tire wear. I run my front slightly less than
it's supposed to be because my bike handles better. My front end
doesn't "bounce" at high speeds. No...not "that" front end. :-) Anyone
who rides *mainly* highway, is going to have their tires wear in the
center faster than the sides. The canyon carvers are going to wear the
sides more. I ride way more highway than twisties, since I use it to
commute everywhere, and yeah, it's a tractor, but it'll still lean a
bit. The "wear in the middle" stuff is meant mainly for cars and
trucks, but *they* don't need to drive on the edges of their tires when
they corner. Every bike setup is going to be different, but I think I'd
be more concerned about smooth cornering than replacing squared off
tires. I got 12,200 miles on my rear on my '01 Vulcan, but it was so
squared off it got squirrelly on curves. Still, those of us on
cruisers, though we *love* our bikes, don't have to worry as much about
our rubber, as those canyon carving sportbikes. Yeah, it's important,
but we're not doing the extremes that the Bob Nixons, Larry Lovisone,
etc. are. Are you going to take responsibility for advising someone on
their tire pressure? The handling of the bike is much more important
than the expense of replacing rubber.
Mag
Thank you for saying what I and probably others are just too damn tired
to try to get across yet again, to yet another one that knows better
than Honda, et al. You really do more than your share. Thanks.
Emore
What I think is funny, is that not too many threads ago motomouth was
saying to NOT underinflate tires, now he's advocating underinflating them.
Stupid fuck can't even get his stories straight.
--
Odinn

'03 FLHTI ........... http://www.sloanclan.org/gallery/ElectraGlide
'97 VN1500D ......... http://odinn-frigga.tripod.com/scoot
Atlanta Biker Net ... http://www.atlantabiker.net
Personal Homepage ... http://odinn-frigga.tripod.com
Vulcan Riders Assoc . http://www.vulcanriders.org

Fill in the blanks to reply
Margaret M.
2003-10-13 00:20:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by emore
Post by Margaret M.
Post by mtm
report that their tires are wearing out the middle section of the tire,
but leaving the outer sections in good shape? Underinflation? No you
hardhead, it's Overinflation.
bit. The "wear in the middle" stuff is meant mainly for cars and
trucks, but *they* don't need to drive on the edges of their tires when
they corner. Every bike setup is going to be different, but I think I'd
Thank you for saying what I and probably others are just too damn tired
to try to get across yet again, to yet another one that knows better
than Honda, et al. You really do more than your share. Thanks.
You're welcome. My main concern is the folks who are new to riding, and
Reeky, that will be reading these threads and automatically assume the
people here *all* know what they are talking about. Some folks here are
experts, bike mechanics, trophy winning racers, or just have years of
experience riding safely; and then there are those that aren't. It's
not always easy distinguishing between them when you are new to a forum.
In the meantime, Newbies, try new things very conservatively, unless you
get a "hell yeah" from the rest of the group, and try to *not* get
yourself killed until you figure out which posters belong to which
group.
Mag
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-13 16:49:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Margaret M.
You're welcome. My main concern is the folks who are new to riding, and
Reeky, that will be reading these threads and automatically assume the
people here *all* know what they are talking about. Some folks here are
experts, bike mechanics, trophy winning racers, or just have years of
experience riding safely; and then there are those that aren't. It's
not always easy distinguishing between them when you are new to a forum.
In the meantime, Newbies, try new things very conservatively, unless you
get a "hell yeah" from the rest of the group, and try to *not* get
yourself killed until you figure out which posters belong to which
group.
Mag
Mag:
I know how you feel - I have seen that many times in the diabetes news
groups.
some people do not know what they are talking about and others have the
attitude
that - this is how it was for me and this is how it must be for you.
while I do not know here who fits where - I do know what you are talking
about.
a simple post like the one you made here can do a lot - I have learned to
express
these concerns to point out bad advice or questionable advice in those
groups with out it turning into flames.
for example if I see someone telling a newbie that they "HAVE TO" go on a
high fat diet in order to control diabetes.
in the post I make to that newbie I tell them they don't have to. I am not
saying in anyway
you or anyone created a flame - its just that I feel your post was an
important one to get across
especially if you see bad advice given out and it should be brought to
newbie's attention.
when I see conflicting advice that I don't understand - it is then time to
see a professional.
but unbelievably thank full for all the advice I have received here.
Tom
Tom
mtm
2003-10-13 18:34:16 UTC
Permalink
Tom ...
Now that everyone's had their say, just do this.
When/if you get a chance Ck this out.
With (just about any) other bike(s) that weigh in at 475 wet, and carry
a 140/70-17 H tire (or thereabouts) rear, tell us/me what they recommend
for tire pressure?
If these folks think that going from 33 psi, to (lets say) 30 to 31 psi,
is gonna 'do you in', then don't bitch when your tires need replacin'
more often than you think they outta.
By what you've said about your ridin' habits (which are somthin' a bit
like mine) let us know next year, at this time, what those tires look
like, okay?
Or better yet, you let me know what kinda shape they're in with like 6
grand on 'em.
I know what mine look like.






mtm

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-14 01:57:17 UTC
Permalink
Ok no problem - I will be sharing all of my experiences on my new ride
when I get it - no comments.
Post by mtm
Tom ...
Now that everyone's had their say, just do this.
When/if you get a chance Ck this out.
With (just about any) other bike(s) that weigh in at 475 wet, and carry
a 140/70-17 H tire (or thereabouts) rear, tell us/me what they recommend
for tire pressure?
If these folks think that going from 33 psi, to (lets say) 30 to 31 psi,
is gonna 'do you in', then don't bitch when your tires need replacin'
more often than you think they outta.
By what you've said about your ridin' habits (which are somthin' a bit
like mine) let us know next year, at this time, what those tires look
like, okay?
Or better yet, you let me know what kinda shape they're in with like 6
grand on 'em.
I know what mine look like.
mtm
'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Brennan
2003-10-14 17:00:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
when I see conflicting advice that I don't understand - it is then time to
see a professional.
Sure. A good rule on usenet is to follow the adage, "extraordinary
claims require extraordinary evidence." If someone is offering advice
contrary to manufacturer's recommended data, he or she should have a
strong body of evidence to back it up. If all that can be offered is
"you just don't get it," and "if you were a real biker you'd know I'm
right," you can bet the farm the poser is full of shit.

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-14 18:28:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brennan
Post by Shadow Spirit
when I see conflicting advice that I don't understand - it is then time to
see a professional.
Sure. A good rule on usenet is to follow the adage, "extraordinary
claims require extraordinary evidence." If someone is offering advice
contrary to manufacturer's recommended data, he or she should have a
strong body of evidence to back it up. If all that can be offered is
"you just don't get it," and "if you were a real biker you'd know I'm
right," you can bet the farm the poser is full of shit.
--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
Brennan:

I have been reading all my threads today. please tell me if im right.
for the speeds I will be driving - lets say I took the engine out of the
Magna
and replaced it with the 1100cc 2 cylinder spirit engine - what differences
would a person
driving slow feel? I heard I can keep the Magna in 1st up to about 30mph I
assume the
same is true for the 1100cc. is the biggest difference that the 750 4
cylinder will be louder do to higher revs?
does it affect stability as slower speeds? I just don't want a bike that is
going to make my job even harder
but I want that power if I want to get out of the city. I wouldn't mind
joining a few riding groups also.
I have very long days and just want the easiest, most comfortable for 2 up
for the type of riding I will be doing.
I want a cruiser not for the chrome or the type of sound they make for me
they just seem more comfortable and designed well like I sit in chairs.
Tom
Brennan
2003-10-14 19:49:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
I have been reading all my threads today. please tell me if im right.
for the speeds I will be driving - lets say I took the engine out of the
Magna
and replaced it with the 1100cc 2 cylinder spirit engine - what differences
would a person
driving slow feel? I heard I can keep the Magna in 1st up to about 30mph I
assume the
same is true for the 1100cc. is the biggest difference that the 750 4
cylinder will be louder do to higher revs?
does it affect stability as slower speeds? I just don't want a bike that is
going to make my job even harder
but I want that power if I want to get out of the city. I wouldn't mind
joining a few riding groups also.
I have very long days and just want the easiest, most comfortable for 2 up
for the type of riding I will be doing.
I want a cruiser not for the chrome or the type of sound they make for me
they just seem more comfortable and designed well like I sit in chairs.
I don't know much about Honda bikes. Guessing:

I'm looking at a picture of the Spirit, it looks like a Sportster
knockoff. The pillion seat doesn't look too comfy, but it's just a
picture. At 1100cc, it might be a bit much for you, and not real
comfortable for your rider. Why are you comparing an 1100 Shadow with
a 750 Magna?

http://www.geocities.com/magna_bikes/magna/specs.html
Rake looks a little long, gas tank a little small, V4 with CV carbs,
pillion looks a little more comfy than the Spirit.

Here's an interesting site:

http://www.texmoto.com/TexMotoMainArticles/TwinsAreTorquey.htm

You should read this article, it explains a lot about the subjects
these threads have been covering. About the Magna 750: "...nearly 42
lb-ft, all the way from 3000 to 9500...." Its peak torque is 46.5 at
7500rpm. That's a nice comfortable bike that will not exhibit quirky
horsepower surges. Read the comparison with the Duc Monster 750. Way
different animals.

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
Margaret M.
2003-10-14 20:12:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brennan
Post by Shadow Spirit
I have very long days and just want the easiest, most comfortable for 2 up
for the type of riding I will be doing.
I want a cruiser not for the chrome or the type of sound they make for me
they just seem more comfortable and designed well like I sit in chairs.
http://www.geocities.com/magna_bikes/magna/specs.html
Rake looks a little long, gas tank a little small, V4 with CV carbs,
pillion looks a little more comfy than the Spirit.
http://www.texmoto.com/TexMotoMainArticles/TwinsAreTorquey.htm
You should read this article, it explains a lot about the subjects
these threads have been covering. About the Magna 750: "...nearly 42
lb-ft, all the way from 3000 to 9500...." Its peak torque is 46.5 at
7500rpm. That's a nice comfortable bike that will not exhibit quirky
horsepower surges. Read the comparison with the Duc Monster 750. Way
different animals.
In addition, to these bikes, (I can't remember how tall you said you
were or the weight of rider and pillion) you might want to check out
Kawasaki's line of bikes. Everyone here has their favorite brands, Kaw
is mine. If the Ninjette isn't the style of bike you want (and it
sounds like you want to go bigger) check out the Vulcan cruiser line.
They have a Vulcan 500 that is a fantastic bike. Lighter than the
Vulcan 800 (my bike) but enough power for highway, and okay for 2-up.
It's a 6 speed tranny, but you keep saying you won't get out of the
lower gears. You can pretty much run the 500 in any gear you want, all
through the power bands, at least riding solo. Before I replaced my 800
after my crash, my buddy let me ride his 500 for a weekend. It was a
little buzzier than I was used to with the extra weight of the 800, but
it had great acceleration, comfortable seating position, and the price
is much lower than what you are pricing at the higher cc. If you are in
the larger size body group, the 800 might be more to your liking. But,
as a first bike, it's heavy; and for God's sake, don't put the wife on
the back until you have many, many miles of experience, and make it past
the first 3-6 month confidence survival spurt.
Mag
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-14 20:47:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by Brennan
Post by Shadow Spirit
I have very long days and just want the easiest, most comfortable for
2 up
Post by Brennan
Post by Shadow Spirit
for the type of riding I will be doing.
I want a cruiser not for the chrome or the type of sound they make
for me
Post by Brennan
Post by Shadow Spirit
they just seem more comfortable and designed well like I sit in
chairs.
Post by Brennan
http://www.geocities.com/magna_bikes/magna/specs.html
Rake looks a little long, gas tank a little small, V4 with CV carbs,
pillion looks a little more comfy than the Spirit.
http://www.texmoto.com/TexMotoMainArticles/TwinsAreTorquey.htm
You should read this article, it explains a lot about the subjects
these threads have been covering. About the Magna 750: "...nearly 42
lb-ft, all the way from 3000 to 9500...." Its peak torque is 46.5 at
7500rpm. That's a nice comfortable bike that will not exhibit quirky
horsepower surges. Read the comparison with the Duc Monster 750. Way
different animals.
In addition, to these bikes, (I can't remember how tall you said you
were or the weight of rider and pillion) you might want to check out
Kawasaki's line of bikes. Everyone here has their favorite brands, Kaw
is mine. If the Ninjette isn't the style of bike you want (and it
sounds like you want to go bigger) check out the Vulcan cruiser line.
They have a Vulcan 500 that is a fantastic bike. Lighter than the
Vulcan 800 (my bike) but enough power for highway, and okay for 2-up.
It's a 6 speed tranny, but you keep saying you won't get out of the
lower gears. You can pretty much run the 500 in any gear you want, all
through the power bands, at least riding solo. Before I replaced my 800
after my crash, my buddy let me ride his 500 for a weekend. It was a
little buzzier than I was used to with the extra weight of the 800, but
it had great acceleration, comfortable seating position, and the price
is much lower than what you are pricing at the higher cc. If you are in
the larger size body group, the 800 might be more to your liking. But,
as a first bike, it's heavy; and for God's sake, don't put the wife on
the back until you have many, many miles of experience, and make it past
the first 3-6 month confidence survival spurt.
Mag
Hi Mag:

im 5 10 my legs are a lil on the short side that's why I don't want a seat
height above 29"
my wife is 160lbs. I did already and read a lot of reviews that is why I
kind of go Hondas way.
I should be more open minded - and the handle bars have to be no wider than
34 inch prefer 33 inch.
I usually check out all the bikes as my budget changes. il go again and
check out the kawa's later.
thank you.. time to get back to work.
Tom
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-14 20:32:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brennan
Post by Shadow Spirit
I have been reading all my threads today. please tell me if im right.
for the speeds I will be driving - lets say I took the engine out of the
Magna
and replaced it with the 1100cc 2 cylinder spirit engine - what differences
would a person
driving slow feel? I heard I can keep the Magna in 1st up to about 30mph I
assume the
same is true for the 1100cc. is the biggest difference that the 750 4
cylinder will be louder do to higher revs?
does it affect stability as slower speeds? I just don't want a bike that is
going to make my job even harder
but I want that power if I want to get out of the city. I wouldn't mind
joining a few riding groups also.
I have very long days and just want the easiest, most comfortable for 2 up
for the type of riding I will be doing.
I want a cruiser not for the chrome or the type of sound they make for me
they just seem more comfortable and designed well like I sit in chairs.
I'm looking at a picture of the Spirit, it looks like a Sportster
knockoff.
yes from the picture i guess you can say that but in person they look more
different.
to me the sporty has a tall slim look and the spirit has a lower look that i
feel would be more stable
with 2 up. lol but as usually not sure.

The pillion seat doesn't look too comfy, but it's just a
Post by Brennan
picture.
i think dealers should change that - if this bike indead can carry 2 up
easily
with that seat it only looks comphy for 1.

At 1100cc, it might be a bit much for you, and not real
Post by Brennan
comfortable for your rider.
very true i remember wondering if the bike that the safety school was going
to be too much for me.
i really had no idea if i was going to be able to ride. but i did very well
if not better than most who have been driving
longer then me and with bigger bikes. - bad habbits are hard to break but
they didnt even have good control at
low speed.

Why are you comparing an 1100 Shadow with
Post by Brennan
a 750 Magna?
i would really love to be able to understand all this talk about torque
and how a low rev engine compared to a hi rev engine would affect the
driving of the same bike.
i didnt mean to compare the 1100 shadow to the magna
i was just wondering what difference the driver would feel if you removed
the 750 mag engine
and replaced it with the shadow 1100cc engine ( if it would fit).
Post by Brennan
http://www.geocities.com/magna_bikes/magna/specs.html
Rake looks a little long, gas tank a little small, V4 with CV carbs,
pillion looks a little more comfy than the Spirit.
http://www.texmoto.com/TexMotoMainArticles/TwinsAreTorquey.htm
You should read this article, it explains a lot about the subjects
these threads have been covering. About the Magna 750: "...nearly 42
lb-ft, all the way from 3000 to 9500...." Its peak torque is 46.5 at
7500rpm.
That's a nice comfortable bike that will not exhibit quirky
Post by Brennan
horsepower surges.
lol i didnt really know how to put it but it was something i was thinking
about.
it pretty much looks like this would be the bike if i can swing it.
it has the power i need the price and the wieght limit also as a 750cc
engine
that i think keeps the insurance down a bit. thanks for the link.
just wondering how good it could be with the name Moto in it - just kiddin
Tom






Read the comparison with the Duc Monster 750. Way
Post by Brennan
different animals.
--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
mtm
2003-10-14 23:36:38 UTC
Permalink
S.S. states:
"...when I see conflicting advise I don't understand - it is then time
to see a professional."

Oh Jeezus yes. If there's anyone that needs a professional, it's you.
But for Krys sakes, stay outta them showrooms. Those places can make you
crazy. If the folks that work in them charged you, for even a portion of
their time you've wasted, you wouldn't have enough cash left to buy a
Schwinn.






mtm

"I know the human being and the fish can coexist peacfully."
G. W. Bush

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Odinn
2003-10-15 00:29:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
"...when I see conflicting advise I don't understand - it is then time
to see a professional."
Oh Jeezus yes. If there's anyone that needs a professional, it's you.
But for Krys sakes, stay outta them showrooms. Those places can make you
crazy. If the folks that work in them charged you, for even a portion of
their time you've wasted, you wouldn't have enough cash left to buy a
Schwinn.
Oh, like the time you've wasted in here?

I've been holding out on killfiling you, HOPING you would eventually make
some sense, but I see that's never gonna happen.

Oh yeah, you get to play in the sandbox all by your lonesome, cuz there's
no one in there but you.

Have fun.

PLONK
--
Odinn

'03 FLHTI ........... http://www.sloanclan.org/gallery/ElectraGlide
'97 VN1500D ......... http://odinn-frigga.tripod.com/scoot
Atlanta Biker Net ... http://www.atlantabiker.net
Personal Homepage ... http://odinn-frigga.tripod.com
Vulcan Riders Assoc . http://www.vulcanriders.org

Fill in the blanks to reply
mtm
2003-10-15 06:37:48 UTC
Permalink
odinn ...
Thank Gaud. Bye now.






mtm

"I know the human being and the fish can coexist peacfully."
G. W. Bush

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Brennan
2003-10-14 14:19:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Margaret M.
The handling of the bike is much more important
than the expense of replacing rubber.
Slam dunk.

--
Al - '98 FLTRI
- '98 T409 EN
- '83 GR650
- '57 6T alt.possessive.its.has.no.apostrophe
Calgary
2003-10-15 06:11:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Brennan
Post by Shadow Spirit
Post by mtm
Just one thing. Any of these three bikes tires, should be run at 5%
Below the manf. suggested pressures. These bikes have been know to have
premature tire wear (center of tread) based on slight overinflation.
thank you.. I will look into that tire pressure thing.
http://www.gwrra.org/regional/ridered/news/May2002.pdf
"Our inspection of tires of various styles & manufacture at rallies
and our subsequent testing have confirmed that underinflation (and/or
excessive load) causes tread groove cracking and can result in more
serious damage within the tire body. Uneven wear may also accompany
underinflated use. Failure to heed these visual warnings can result in
tire failure or blowout."
http://www.coopertire.com/us/en/safety/tireSafetyInstructions.asp
"Correct tire pressure is very important. Driving on any tire that
does not have the correct inflation pressure is dangerous. Proper
inflation pressure for your tires may be found in the vehicle owner's
manual or the vehicle's tire information placard.
"Any underinflated tire builds up excessive heat that may result in
sudden tire destruction."
http://www.ride-on.com/news.htm
"The No. 1 reason for roadside repair - year after year - is tires. In
2001, 53% of road calls for trucks and tractors handled by a major
service provider were tires. For trailers, 48% were for tires. Most
likely, many failures happened because of underinflated tires. FNA's
Summer feels about half of the tire-related road calls his vendors
handle could be eliminated by better tire maintenance, especially
proper tire inflation."
= = =
Are you beginning to see a pattern here? Moto pisses and moans about
how he was unfairly flamed for recommending underinflating tires. The
fact appears to be that underinflating is missing proper inflation in
the more dangerous direction. Recall that underinflated tires was a
big factor in the recent Ford Explorer - Firestone tire debacle.
Please look into it. Note that dozens of references on why
underinflating is bad can be found, and the only reference Moto has to
the contrary is "the guy at the Goodyear store." Go see the guy at
your local Goodyear dealer and see what he has to say. By all means
accept and evaluate all opinions given, but please try to err on the
side of caution. Your life is at stake; don't trust it to some
airhead on usenet.
Moto still not letting mere facts get in the way of his fiction.

Tread (pun intended) carefully when taking free advice from total and
anonymous strangers as the gospel on tire safety & wear.


84 - Virago 1000
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/
"Daniel Hopgood"
mtm
2003-10-15 06:46:20 UTC
Permalink
Calgary ...
Where the hell ya been?

Your "advise" to SS isn't gonna do much good, IMO. I think the standard
PSI on a Schwinn is about 40 lbs, and a few pounds higher or lower ain't
gonna matter much. :)






mtm

"I know the human being and the fish can coexist peacfully."
G. W. Bush

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
SRQEagan
2003-10-15 13:11:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by mtm
Calgary ...
Where the hell ya been?
Your "advise" to SS isn't gonna do much good, IMO. I think the standard
PSI on a Schwinn is about 40 lbs, and a few pounds higher or lower ain't
gonna matter much. :)
OMG....I can't believe you are comparing a bicycle to....oh, never mind. I
would put you back in the twit bin, but you are now handing out dangerous
information/advice to newbies to the sport. Hopefully, SS hasn't taken any of
your ill-informed / reckless advice to heart.

Iggy
'01 Dyna Super Glide
'96 Mustang GT Convertible
Keep your powder dry and don't let your meat-loaf. :o)
mtm
2003-10-16 03:06:02 UTC
Permalink
Iggy ...
This just proves how dumb you really are.

Take a couple minutes, start from the top (pick any thread started by
this clown) and tell us what you see. You've been chumped Eagan! Piddie
lives.
bwahahahahaha






mtm

"Rice Krispies. East meets west"
Cosmo Kramer

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
XS11E
2003-10-16 00:54:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Calgary
Post by Brennan
Post by mtm
Just one thing. Any of these three bikes tires, should be run
at 5% Below the manf. suggested pressures. These bikes have
been know to have premature tire wear (center of tread) based
on slight overinflation.
Please look into it. Note that dozens of references on why
underinflating is bad can be found, and the only reference Moto
has to the contrary is "the guy at the Goodyear store." Go see
the guy at your local Goodyear dealer and see what he has to say.
By all means accept and evaluate all opinions given, but please
try to err on the side of caution. Your life is at stake; don't
trust it to some airhead on usenet.
Moto still not letting mere facts get in the way of his fiction.
Tread (pun intended) carefully when taking free advice from total
and anonymous strangers as the gospel on tire safety & wear.
Let's be fair, Moto said that overinflation caused the center of the
tread to wear faster, this is true, although a slight overinflation
won't make any difference. He also said to run the tire 5% below the
manufacturer's suggested pressure. On a tire inflated to 40lbs that's
a drop of 2lbs and that's probably outside the accuracy of most
inexpensive tire gauges.

I sincerely doubt the overinflation or underinflation by 5% will make
any difference, again, using your El Cheapo Manny Moe and Jack gauge,
adding or dropping 5% might actually get the pressure correct.
Calgary
2003-10-16 02:25:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by XS11E
Post by Calgary
Post by Brennan
Post by mtm
Just one thing. Any of these three bikes tires, should be run
at 5% Below the manf. suggested pressures. These bikes have
been know to have premature tire wear (center of tread) based
on slight overinflation.
Please look into it. Note that dozens of references on why
underinflating is bad can be found, and the only reference Moto
has to the contrary is "the guy at the Goodyear store." Go see
the guy at your local Goodyear dealer and see what he has to say.
By all means accept and evaluate all opinions given, but please
try to err on the side of caution. Your life is at stake; don't
trust it to some airhead on usenet.
Moto still not letting mere facts get in the way of his fiction.
Tread (pun intended) carefully when taking free advice from total
and anonymous strangers as the gospel on tire safety & wear.
Let's be fair, Moto said that overinflation caused the center of the
tread to wear faster, this is true, although a slight overinflation
won't make any difference. He also said to run the tire 5% below the
manufacturer's suggested pressure. On a tire inflated to 40lbs that's
a drop of 2lbs and that's probably outside the accuracy of most
inexpensive tire gauges.
I sincerely doubt the overinflation or underinflation by 5% will make
any difference, again, using your El Cheapo Manny Moe and Jack gauge,
adding or dropping 5% might actually get the pressure correct.
I don't disagree. Personally, I think we are taking all this tire
pressure crap too seriously. Unless you are pushing the edge of the
envelope with your riding style a couple of pounds here or there are
not going to make a difference.

That being said, I could see a newbie gaining a false confidence in
perceived increased traction because the guy pretending to be an
expert on the subject suggested significantly increased tire wear and
traction is realized by monkeying around with the tire pressure.

The funny part of all this has been the application of automobile tire
theory to bike tires. They are different animals.

Hey I just got back from Maine and had a great time. Even the weather
was good for a couple of days riding. I will post some pics to a web
page as soon as I am unpacked and settled back in.


84 - Virago 1000
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/
"Daniel Hopgood"
XS11E
2003-10-16 23:00:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Calgary
Hey I just got back from Maine and had a great time. Even the
weather was good for a couple of days riding.
Glad to hear it, I guess you went about as late in the year as possible
to still have good weather??

PS, Watch out for the Majestik M00se!
Calgary
2003-10-16 23:16:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by XS11E
PS, Watch out for the Majestik M00se!
Yeah they are everywhere. It was hunting season and the only moose I
saw were in the back of pick up trucks..

I did hear a story of a guy who low sided under one of those animals.


84 - Virago 1000
http://www3.telus.net/public/dbinns/
"Daniel Hopgood"
mtm
2003-10-16 03:34:24 UTC
Permalink
XS11E ...
Another of the folks payin' attention. I knew there hadda be a couple.
<bg>

Your dead right about those Pep Boys $.99 cheapie gauges. I have a
digital. Reads in 1/2 lb increments. I set my other (adjustable) Suzuki
gauges with it, and I carry those in our cars. Worth every penny I paid
for that digital.

I gotta 'thing' about tires. NEVER would I steer anybody wrong about
tires. In the case of the Nighthawks and Magnas just a slight change,
makes a big difference in traction and mileage. That's important to me.
With only two small patches of rubber between rider and road rash, you
can't afford to ignore the smallest detail when it comes to those tires.






mtm

"Rice Krispies. East meets west"
Cosmo Kramer

'95 750 Nighthawk (big red)
'95 Helix (little red)
Kawasakibob
2003-10-10 11:25:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in and
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and I
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I don't know im thinking tomorrow go to the DMV and get my license. can
anyone guess where I might go Saturday?
Shadow.
Search the web. I am sure there is an owners group/site somewhere. They
will be able to answer all of your questions/concerns. Good luck and
enjoy your new ride!
Lori
2003-10-10 13:01:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kawasakibob
Search the web. I am sure there is an owners group/site somewhere.
SabMag http://www.sabmag.org

Magna Riders Association http://www.magnariders.com/

Yahoo Magna riders group
http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Magna_motorcycles/

Just to name a few...

____

Lori
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 17:16:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kawasakibob
Search the web. I am sure there is an owners group/site somewhere.
SabMag http://www.sabmag.org
Magna Riders Association http://www.magnariders.com/
Yahoo Magna riders group
http://autos.groups.yahoo.com/group/Magna_motorcycles/
Just to name a few...
____
Lori
Hey Lori:

thank you. I will definitely look into those places.
I feel confident I have made the right choice for me... thank you all.
Tom
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 17:15:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kawasakibob
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in and
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and I
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I don't know im thinking tomorrow go to the DMV and get my license. can
anyone guess where I might go Saturday?
Shadow.
Search the web. I am sure there is an owners group/site somewhere. They
will be able to answer all of your questions/concerns. Good luck and
enjoy your new ride!
yea I guess I could do that - but for now I see no reason to look else where
for people to talk to about motorcycles. I like the different opinions
and here there are plenty. but yes I also do my own research I don't just
come here expecting all the answers lol even though I get the best ones
here.
Tom and thanks for the good luck wish.
aruff
2003-10-10 13:49:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in and
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser and I
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I don't know im thinking tomorrow go to the DMV and get my license. can
anyone guess where I might go Saturday?
Shadow.
Good luck. Ride safe and enjoy.
Shadow Spirit
2003-10-10 17:17:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by aruff
Post by Shadow Spirit
well right now I am thinking it is the Magna - I could basically walk in
and
Post by Shadow Spirit
walk out with it.
no need for large downpayment - I heard some pretty bad things about this
bike as well as some good.
I think it would be a great bike for the streets here.
I don't like the chain drive but it is compy to sit on like a cruiser
and
Post by aruff
I
Post by Shadow Spirit
believe it can turn faster.
after all I really only wanted a cruiser for the comfort but wanted
something that can turn tight at slower speeds.
I don't know im thinking tomorrow go to the DMV and get my license. can
anyone guess where I might go Saturday?
Shadow.
Good luck. Ride safe and enjoy.
thanks aruf I will.
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